Reading Through Nancy Drew (Books 1-10)

Book One: The Secret of the Old Clock

It’s hard not to love the mystery that started it all. In The Secret of the Old Clock, readers are introduced to Nancy, an attractive, rich, and popular eighteen-year-old who enjoys helping her lawyer father with his cases. A chance encounter leads her to suspect that a rich bachelor left a second will to his fortune, and she begins tracking down his relatives to uncover more clues. This story establishes many of the later traits of the series, such as Nancy’s curiosity and resolve, her involvement with Carson Drew’s legal work, and her ability to ingratiate herself into the lives of random strangers so she can solve mysteries for them.

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Book Two: The Hidden Staircase

Who doesn’t love a classic haunted house mystery? In her second case, Nancy answers a friend’s plea to discover the truth behind the ghost frightening her relatives. At the same time, Nancy begins to investigate a railroad case her father is working on, and the threats he is receiving as a result. This is a fun mystery that includes all the staples such as hidden passages, disguises, and good old-fashioned sleuthing.

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Book Three: The Bungalow Mystery

Nancy’s third mystery gets a little wilder than the previous installments. This time, Nancy suspects that the guardians of a girl she met while on vacation are not what they seem. As usual, her mystery ends up being connected with a case her father is working on, though the odds of such a connection are slim indeed. Readers will need a healthy helping of credulity to enjoy this story, but that is true of most of Nancy’s mysteries.

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Book Four: The Mystery at Lilac Inn

This is arguably one of the weaker installments of the series. The motivations of the villain are a little unbelievable, as is her bizarre method of revenge. A series of coincidences ends up connecting two disparate cases Nancy is working on, and she ends up solving the mystery largely by stumbling into the villains instead of by actively sleuthing. The plot is also a bit redundant, recycling elements from previous books such as a capsized boat, a storm, and a haunted building.

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Book Five: The Secret of Shadow Ranch

Shadow Ranch is one of the most popular Nancy Drew books, and for good reason. This story takes Nancy out West, where the author delights in creating a deeply atmospheric setting full of old cave dwellings, square dancing, and horseback riding. The accuracy of this depiction may be suspect, but it is fun, and the setting is furthermore tied to a romantic story involving the doomed love between an outlaw and a sheriff’s daughter, which gives the story a sense of historical depth. This installment is also notable for introducing Nancy’s best friends George and Bess and for name dropping Ned, though Nancy will not actually meet him until book seven. All this, combined with a fast-paced plot and hint of romance with Dave the cowboy, makes Shadow Ranch one of the best Nancy Drew mysteries.

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Book Six: The Secret of Red Gate Farm

The Secret of Red Gate Farm throws a new, tantalizing mystery Nancy’s way as she tries to figure out why a mysterious saleswoman was so reluctant to sell Bess a bottle of perfume, as well as whether or not the “nature cult” on Red Gate Farm is truly what it seems. As usual, Nancy manages to solve the case when no one else can simply because she is incredibly lucky. The bottle of perfume, the man she meets on the train, the strange job advertisement her friend answers, and the cult–they all happen to be related! But, though the plot is unbelievable, it is still entertaining. I enjoyed something new since three of the last five books included haunted properties.

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Book Seven: The Clue in the Diary

Book seven is most notable for the introduction of Ned Nickerson, soon to be Nancy’s steady boyfriend (for the next few decades!). It is fun to see the usually composed Nancy start to blush and get nervous around Ned, who quickly proves himself a valuable asset to the sleuthing team. Nancy deserves someone who is interested in and supportive of her work, and she gets that in Ned, who gamely runs errands for Nancy and is always willing to lend a hand. There’s also a mystery involving two missing persons, a suspected arson, and mail theft, but, it is not one of the stronger plot lines in the series.

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Book Eight: Nancy’s Mysterious Letter

Book eight is not known for being one of the stronger installments of the series, but I admit I heartily enjoyed this mystery. Nancy mistakenly receives a letter addressed to another Nancy Drew, who has inherited a fortune in England. Now, Nancy must find the other woman before she is swindled out of her money. The story is essentially a comedy of errors, with Nancy tracking down two individuals, and always arriving at their former location just as they have left. There may be little mystery here, since Nancy knows exactly whom she seeks. But I enjoyed the chase nonetheless.

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Book Nine: The Sign of the Twisted Candles

Book nine is certainly one of the stronger mysteries of the series. Nancy arrives at an inn to investigate rumors that the old man who lives there is being kept as a prisoner in the tower by the innkeepers. In the process, she discovers an ancient feud that also threatens to estrange her from Bess and George. A gripping plot, combined with richly-drawn characters, secret compartments, and plenty of danger makes this a thrilling story.

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Book Ten: Password to Larkspur Lane

Password to Larkspur Lane continues a strong streak for the series. An injured messenger pigeon leads Nancy to two related mysteries, one involving a strange wheel of fire at her friend’s grandparents’ house and one involving a missing woman. Nancy does some solid sleuthing, piecing together some fairly tenuous clues to arrive at the truth, before attempting a daring rescue escape, complete with disguises, angry guard dogs, and airplanes. The series needs more stories like this!

15 thoughts on “Reading Through Nancy Drew (Books 1-10)

  1. Greg says:

    This is so awesome. I love revisiting these stories! I’ve re- read some Hardy Boys in the last few years and have thought about trying some Nancy Drew’s as well. I read some as a kid but I don’t remember all the ones I read. And yes, the issue with her cases often being intertwined with her father’s cases- that pattern shows up in the Hardy Boys mysteries a LOT as well! 🙂

    Twisted Candles looks awesome!

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      I’ve actually never read a Hardy Boys mystery! I often think I should pick one up to see if I might enjoy them, as well.

      Twisted Candles is one of the first Nancy Drews I read and I think, so far, it’s still one of the best in terms of plot, pacing, etc.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      These were the yellow hardback versions seen in the pictures, revised in the 50s. I have reviewed some of the original versions previously, but they are obviously not as easy to access.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Arwen McGilvra says:

        Thanks. Yes those are the ones I have the most of too. If I knew how to attach pics to a comment I’d show you my Nancy Drew shelf. I mostly pick up the earlier editions at antique shops now though they are starting to ask $15/book which seems like A LOT.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Krysta says:

          Wow. That does seem like a lot to ask. I’m no expert, but I do periodically see the older Nancy Drews being sold at flea markets and book sales, even if in bad condition, so it seems like they aren’t exactly uncommon. Years ago I picked up a few of the older editions for many three dollars apiece. I had to donate them, though, when I moved.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      I haven’t seen it! I read it’s a bit sexier and certainly more supernatural! I think it’s fun that Nancy has been able to go through so many adaptations over the years.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. LitforQueers says:

    I have never read Nancy Drew, but I love the new CW adaptation. These characters are my new comfort idiots after having to watch “Falcon and The Winter Soldier” with a sad heart.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      I was initially missing ten in my collection, and then I gave them all away because I had no room for them. Luckily, the library is there for me so I can have my comfort reads! It’s been fun going through them!

      Like

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