5 Reasons Book Blogs are Great Places to Promote Books

Although publishers seem to be concentrating their marketing an efforts on bookstagram and booktube, sending influencers on these platforms ARCs and even monetary compensation that book bloggers often are not offered, book blogs are still excellent places for promotion. Here are five reasons publishers and authors should still work with book bloggers to have their books featured on blogs.

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1

Bloggers Who Feature Books Generally Read the Books

I am not saying that bookstagrammers and booktubers don’t read books; clearly they do. However, it is also very common on these platforms for large influencers who have been sent books for promotion to only run a promotional post (perhaps because they are given so many books they literally cannot read them all). So they wave the book in their air during a video, noting they were sent the book and it looks interesting (but they haven’t read it), or they post a pretty photo on Instagram and write a caption with the book summary and say it looks interesting (but they haven’t read it).

Book bloggers are much less likely to do this. When book bloggers post about books (barring posts like TBR lists), they have generally read the book. They aren’t recommending it because they were sent it for promotion and are being paid to tell people to read it; they’re recommending it because they actually read the book and liked it. And genuine recommendations are worth a lot.

2

Bloggers Post Full Reviews

Booktube and various social media are great for generally putting a book on my radar, for letting me know that the book exists in the first place and other readers seem to be hyped about it. But if I want to really know whether I should read a book, to try to decide whether I would like the book or whether I should spend the money to purchase the book, I look at reviews on blogs. Some bookstagrammers and booktubers do long reviews, too, of course, but I personally find them most accessible on blogs; I don’t like listening to ten minute videos, and my eyes sort of glaze over if an Instagram caption gets too long. Book blogs are the perfect platform to find full, in-depth reviews that actually help me make up my mind about whether or not I am going to pick up a book.

Blog Posts Have a Long Life, Marketing Books Long After Release Date

If I tweet something, I’m lucky if people see it 20 minutes after I posted it. My Instagram posts get the most interaction the day they go live. On my blog, however, I have people looking at posts I wrote 8, 9, even 10 years ago. Getting social media attention for a book around release date is important, but keeping buzz about the book alive long after its pub date is worthwhile, too. Blogs can help backlist titles find new readers and make new sales for the author, even long after the blogger posted about the books.

four

Bloggers Post on Multiple Platforms

These days, few book bloggers have just a blog. If you send a book blogger a book to review, it is highly likely they will also talk about the book on Goodreads, Instagram, and Twitter, not to mention a variety of other platforms ranging from Amazon to BookSloth to Pinterest.

Blog Readers Love to Discuss and Debate

Blog comments are a great place for readers to discuss and debate books. Blogs aren’t just one and done things where the blogger posts a review and that’s it; often readers will continue discussion of a book and what did and didn’t work for them in the comments. This is also a place where readers might discuss questions a book raised or themes it touched on, which is exciting for authors who hope their book will get people thinking and talking.


What are some of the best reasons you think book blogs are excellent places for book promotion?

Briana

47 thoughts on “5 Reasons Book Blogs are Great Places to Promote Books

    • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

      Yes, I think the one downside is it’s hard to find other blogs once you are on a blog, and recommending other accounts is how other platforms suck you in and keep you there, but I think blogs offer so much in terms of long-form content and longevity of that content!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Kitten says:

    All the other reasons are very true. I have to completely agree with blog posts having a long life. Usually when I wanted to know if certain book/s were good enough, I won’t search for YouTube or Bookstagram, I used to simply do a search on google and would get tons of review blogs that were posted years ago but were still useful! Also, yes, I see many book bloggers having a Instagram too! So there’s always chances of author/s getting double promotion on their books.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Krysta says:

      Yes, we get lots of search hits for our reviews, so people end up reading them years after. It’s not like some social media platforms where the post goes away within a few hours or days.

      Like

  2. Sophie @BewareOfTheReader says:

    Well I think all of these are valid reasons! The permanence of a blog post and its lenght is why I love reviewing here. That’s also why I hate Twitter as I can’t express my thoughts on a book in so few words! I also think that you can add multiple links into your posts and lots of pictures or graphics and that’s something you can’t do on Instagram or Twitter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      Yes, I like that blogs give you space to write something that is in-depth! I just can’t gauge whether I really want to read a book from a two sentence Twitter review.

      Like

    • Krysta says:

      Most blogs have review policies that should say if they’re open to requests/reviews. Hopefully they won’t commit to too many at a time, but I guess it can be hard to resist the call of books.

      Like

    • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

      Yes! I rarely read Instagram captions! Other people keep telling me they *do* read them, but I can’t possibly be alone in going on Instagram to look at pictures and not caring so much about what the caption says– and there’s a 50% chance the caption isn’t even about the book in the photo.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. mel @ Literally Mel says:

    this is an awesome post and I totally agree with all your points. I think with visual platforms it’s a lot easier to say you’ve read a book or that a book is great without having read it because it’s more necessary to keep variety in your visual content and feature different books, whereas with blogs you really need to have read the book to keep your content engaging. On bookstagram I also definitely tend to look more at the photos than read the captions, so even if someone does review a book, I’m not likely to read a longer caption.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

      I always feel like the only person who barely reads Instagram captions because when I say I just glance at the photos, I get all these responses like, “Gasp! I read the captions all the time!” And I recently saw advice that Instagram captions should be long in 2021 to keep engagement. It’s so weird to me because that is not how I use Instagram at all. And it’s even more confusing when people post book photos and then write a caption that has nothing to do with the book in the photo. You basically have no idea what the caption is going to be about, whether it’s going to be a book review or a general life musing, or what! To me, it just makes much more sense to get book recommendations from blogs!

      Like

  4. Abby @ Beyond the Read says:

    100% agree with all of these reasons, especially the one about giving genuine recommendations!! It’s sort of baffling to me how publishing fails to make use of such a valuable community. Apparently even BookTokers are being compensated now, and considering how short of a time they’ve been around for, I think that really goes to show how underappreciated book blogs are.

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    • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

      Yeah, I read the NYT BookTok article, and I think it’s interesting because if the platform is moving that many backlist titles, it’s hard to argue with the power of the platform, and I see why publishers are compensating people who are directly moving tens of thousands of copies of books. I acknowledge bloggers don’t do that. However, I joined TikTok to see what’s up, and I think the article at least overstated how popular BookTok accounts in general are. There seem to be a lot that hover around getting 300 views per video (and a view can be someone watching one second of the video, not the whole thing.) And personally I’ve found it hard to find valuable or interesting content. It’s like people filming memes, or dressing up and saying a quote from the book dramatically. Or making videos like “two books with dragons I recommend” like I can’t find a list of 100 books with dragons on a blog. I admit…I don’t really “get” it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Abby @ Beyond the Read says:

        Very true! There’s definitely something more convenient about watching short videos than scrolling through an entire blog post, so I guess I can understand where publishers are coming from. But honestly, I agree with you. I’ve never really understood the appeal of TikTok as a whole. Maybe I’m just used to reading fangirly blog posts with 2k words, but the platform doesn’t seem like the place to find the kind of excitement about books I see on blogs every day. I don’t doubt that many BookTokers are passionate about what they do, but it’s rather hard to get that across in 60 seconds or less.

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        • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

          Yes, I know a lot of people are put off by long posts, and I’m constantly seeing people say that, even if they like blogs, they don’t like LONG reviews. But, for me, there’s a certain threshold where, if there post is too short…it doesn’t say anything. I need more info than “This was so great and so sad and I loved the characters!!!” because that doesn’t really help me decide if I would like the book.

          Liked by 1 person

  5. Eustacia | Eustea Reads says:

    All of this + Book Blogs are better for SEO (at least in Google, for now). When I google for a book, if I’m not looking at Goodreads, then I’m looking at Google search results, which means that I’m looking at blogposts. Instagram posts don’t really turn up and neither do videos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

      Yes! I think that helps a lot with longevity and people who are looking for specific content. It’s true that on other platforms it’s easier to find other accounts on that platform- so Youtube will rec me other booktube accounts if I watch a booktube video, and TikTok will show me other booktok accounts- but if people Google specific information looking for a specific review or a list of books about a specific topic, they are definitely getting blogs and other web sites as results! I have seen at least one person (Gen Z?) actually say if they are interested in a book they go on Instagram and search for the book and look for reviews, but I don’t know how common that is. I’d think you’d end up with a lot of pictures of the book, but half the captions would not actually be reviews of the book in the photo.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Kat Impossible says:

    I agree with every single point you mention! There’s really no other platform I am willing to read a long review on as much as on blogs, because I definitely don’t always check the entire caption on instagram or watch lengthy videos. And as you said, these platforms are great at bringing attention to books existing, but when I want to know more about them, blogs are the way to go. Thanks for putting together this great list!!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Kat @ Bookish Blades says:

    I very much agree with all of this!! Blogs are amazing also for people like me who can’t concentrate on anything that’s a video or don’t like reading on their phones! I know that this is just a personal preference but I’ve heard from a lot of people that they don’t read reviews or longer captions on instagram, mostly because it’s small and uncomfortable to read and blogs make that so much easier!

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    • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

      Good point about platforms like Instagram and TikTok being best viewed on a phone. I personally like doing anything of substance on my laptop because it’s easier to navigate and to see, so having limited functionality of sites like Instagram and TikTok there is a big downside for me.

      Like

  8. Roberta R. says:

    Awesome post! I must admit watching/listening to vlogs or looking at pics is not my thing. I’m a written word lady LOL. But apart from my personal preferences, you made such valid points.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. msbookworld says:

    Great post. I’ve experienced it first hand where I’ve added books to my tbr having seen it on Instagram but only ended up reading the book after I read a rave review of it. I’ve also ended up buying a new copy of an old favorite after being reminded of it via a book blog

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Michael J. Miller says:

    First, a huge and heartfelt AMEN to everything you’ve said above! Second, it’s always seemed odd to me that bookstagram, BookTube, BookTok, and all that seem to be more highly prized by publishers as they want people TO READ LENGTHY BOOKS THAT ARE FILLED WITH WRITTEN WORDS. A blog piece, be it a shorter review or a longer/more detailed one, seems a far more natural fit to discuss a several hundred page book. People who come to blogs clearly like to read as they are seeking actual articles and reviews and discussion posts as opposed to just a quick photo or video. Authors put time into their work! And the authors and publishers want you to read them, too! A blog piece invites, as you put so well above, a conversation and contemplation you don’t see in those other platforms (at least not in the same way) with an audience who generally like to read. Working with writers, working within the online writing community that is bloggers, seems the natural place to promote books.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      I’m actually a bit confused about the number of bloggers I’ve seen saying they don’t want to read lengthy reviews and that too much text is intimidating and so forth. I can read a 400 page book, so certainly five paragraphs on a blog is not going to deter me. Maybe it’s just that, when we are on the internet, our brains want bite-sized information because that’s what we’re used to? But all that is to say that I agree. It seems weird to me that publishers and writers and lovers of the written word often seem to not want to prioritize it. Surely it must at least be gratifying to see readers engaging with your work on a deeper level and taking time to discuss it with fellow fans. Maybe they’re not going to get a bunch of revenue from it like they might with a viral TikTok video, but that doesn’t mean the blog post is worthless.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Michael J. Miller says:

        I wonder, too, about our collective potential – as bloggers ourselves but also on the publishers’ end – to change, or at least diversify this. At the end of the day, corporations across the board are just looking to make money. And I can’t fault them for that (well, I can, but that’s a conversation for a different day XD). The types of movies and music and TV shows and novels and comics and media we get are shaped, in large part, by what we consume. What we click on, what we share, what we get excited about affects things. So if we, the blogging community who reads and buys and loves and talk about books all the time, are favoring TikTok or YouTube to written posts, it makes sense the publishers shift, too. I grant it’s not as simple as a direct correlation and how “the internet as a whole” works is an issue, too, but I do think there is real potential to shift the spotlight.

        Like

        • Krysta says:

          I do think it might be worth thinking about/talking about how to support blogs. It seems to me that many bloggers are getting disillusioned with blogging because the numbers and the publisher appreciation just isn’t there, and so a lot are shifting to YouTube or TikTok to try to get that engagement. I think this is fine if video is really someone’s passion, but I don’t think people should feel that they HAVE to shift to an entirely different platform just to be seen and appreciated.

          And, yeah, the publishers are probably following our behavior to a certain extent. I know that New York Times article about BookTok creating bestsellers out of backlist titles got everyone excited about moving to TikTok. Perhaps unsaid is that not everything is a success story and the mere fact that someone posted something on TikTok does not now make a book a bestseller. I imagine bloggers who shift to TikTok may still have trouble getting views or ARCs.

          So, yeah, I think there’s real value in asking ourselves why we blog and what makes it worthwhile and what we really want out of it. For my part, I don’t really care what publishers think. I don’t blog to market their books for them; I do it to talk about books with other book lovers. But even that means maybe I can find more ways to uplift and engage with other bloggers who want to make those connections.

          Liked by 1 person

  11. Molly's Book Nook says:

    The first point is so true. I never really thought of that but if I see a book on instagram, I don’t know whether the person read it or not (unless they state that in the caption). Whereas with bloggers, the only time a book isn’t read is if its on a tbr of somesort. Otherwise, reviews, book lists, top ten tuesdays, etc, are usually filled with books the person has read and recommend! Also, I don’t like listening to long videos either lol I don’t watch booktube because I want to just get to the point. With blogs, I can read the review much faster than sit through a 10 minute video lol All the points in this post are true though! Even if people think blogging isn’t that great, they really are a great place to promote books 🙂

    Like

  12. Shayna R says:

    Very true! And thanks for the extra hit of inspiration. Blogging has been a struggle for me for the past year and a half, and I’m fighting my way back to it.

    Like

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