Snapdragon by Kat Leyh

Information

Goodreads: Snapdragon
Series: None
Source: Library
Published: February 2020

Summary

The neighborhood kids say the old lady down the way is a witch who eats roadkill. But Snap knows better. Jacks collects roadkill to dry their bones and sell the skeletons online. And, now, Snap is helping. But Jacks possesses more power than she initially lets on. Could it be Jacks really is a witch?

Star Divider

Review

I dove into Snapdragon not really knowing what to expect. The summary mentions selling roadkill. The cover image also promises a story that is maybe a tad bit weird. (It did not help that I thought the protagonist had antlers. It turns out that’s just Snap’s hair.) Well, Snapdragon is a little bit weird, if, by “weird” you mean, “Features an old woman who collects roadkill and then dries it out and reassembles the bones to sell online and, oh, yes, she actually does possess magic and she can see ghosts and move with energy.” Having finished the book, I am still not really sure what I think of it. But readers who like their middle grade graphic novels just a little bit odd will surely enjoy Snapdragon.

Initially, I thought Snapdragon was another middle grade graphic novel about the protagonist making friends and finding themselves. Snap’s father is gone, her mother works late, and she does not have any friends at school–not until she meets Lu, who shares her love of horror movies. She is more interested in learning about anatomy from the library and assembling animal skeletons with Jacks, a woman the neighborhood kids claim is a witch, but someone Snap thinks is just living on the fringes of society. Snap is one of those precocious characters who seemingly spends too much time alone due to their unusual, but absorbing hobbies. I figured she was just going to make a new friend and learn to be confident in her weirdness.

So I was a bit surprised when it turns out that Jacks really does possess magic! Maybe I was disappointed by this because I thought I was reading a contemporary middle grade, not a fantasy. But, somehow, Jacks seemed more interesting when she was just misunderstood by society and not, in fact, a witch like everybody said. And the story seemed more interesting when it focused on Snap’s character development, without the aid of magic. Once she learns she can harness energy like Jacks, her problems seem too easily solved–it just takes a wave of the wrist.

I know Snapdragon was one of the most buzzed about graphic novels in early 2020 and that most reviews are highly enthusiastic. However, I just did not connect with the story. It is a solid middle grade offering. I just don’t think it stands out as much as everyone else seems to.

3 Stars

4 thoughts on “Snapdragon by Kat Leyh

  1. Jackie B @ Death by Tsundoku says:

    I won’t lie — the cover art turned me away from this when I saw it at the library. I, too, thought that Snap had antlers, and as a result expected fantasy (Which it is?). I completely understand your disappointment in learning Jacks IS a witch, too. Darn it.

    This is part of a series — is there a cliffhanger at the end? Are you interested in seeing what comes next?

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      I admit I only read this because I didn’t have many graphic novel options. The cover art is just too…weird…or something for me.

      Oh dear. It’s not part of a series (So far. That I know of.) I made a mistake! At least I know someone reads my posts carefully–more carefully than I do! So, no, it doesn’t end in a cliffhanger, though I imagine that, if the book does well, the author could easily do the continuing adventures of Snap and friends. I don’t think I’d read it, though.

      Liked by 1 person

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