Is Religion YA’s Last Taboo?

In December 2018, Donna Freitas wrote an article for The New York Times titled “Is Any Topic Off Limits When You Write for Teenagers?  Maybe Just One.”  In it, she argues that, while YA has done a lot of good work in becoming more diverse in recent years, one topic remains unmentionable: religion.  I argued much the same in 2016 in  my post “Why Aren’t We Talking about Religious Diversity?”  Even though we talk about representing all kinds of characters so young readers can see themselves reflected in literature, we simply cannot represent characters of faith.  Readers, it seems, sometimes fear that even mentioning that a character has a religion could make a book “preachy.”  Talking about a character who prays, goes to synagogue, or asks questions about their faith is “evangelizing” and could tempt impressionable youth to convert on the spot, or at least just be annoying.  Many people seem to distinguish no difference between a character making a soapbox speech about why their religion is the best and a character who is simply depicted as wearing ashes on Ash Wednesday or fasting during Ramadan.

However, religious practices are part of the daily lives of many and spiritual beliefs influence what people do, think, and say.  This is simply reality.  A person of faith will likely see the world in a unique way and have to navigate it a little differently.  Maybe they realize the cafeteria is not serving anything they can eat that day.  Maybe they have to skip a sleepover so they can go to Mass.  Maybe they struggle with wanting to wait for marriage, but having feelings for someone or being mocked for their beliefs.  Maybe they want to lie, but wrestle with the knowledge that doing so is a sin.  Not depicting these things continues to make people of faith the “Other,” the weirdos, the fringe freaks.

Donna Freitas addresses the problem of non-representation very poignantly:

To ignore religion in Y.A. cedes the entire conversation about religion and spirituality, and all that it stands for, to exactly the kind of intolerant voices that Y.A. publishing has fought so hard against. Teenage readers search for themselves in books. The world of Y.A. is an activist one — an ideal sphere in which to interrupt the toxic religion-speak and attitudes that dominate our politics and culture at the moment, and to model the kind of spiritual longing so many young adults harbor, often secretly. Like me, they learn to be ashamed of it.

In other words, the silence around religion in YA continues to make religion seem like a shameful secret.  People fear to admit that they are religious because they do not want to be mocked or even threatened.  They do not want to be identified as a lunatic or a bigot.  They do not want to be seen part of that religion where “all priests are predators” or where “everyone is a terrorist.”  And these fears are not unfounded.  When religious characters are depicted in YA, they are often represented negatively as prudish, over-scrupulous, or brainwashed.  They’re the freak who won’t sleep around or the character who is clearly only religious because they can’t think for themselves.  When YA depicts religion only to deride it, readers learn that being religious is indefensible.

YA, however, has the power to change that and to show readers that being religious does not have to be a dirty little secret.  Depicting characters as religious would show what should be obvious: people of faith are normal people.  The people we all already attend school with, work with, and hang out with.  They’re not all crazed, brainwashed, or perpetually evangelizing.  They are simply people.  Moreover, depicting more characters of faith could show the wide range of what it means to be religious.  Even in religions like Catholicism where dogma says what Catholics must believe, plenty of people who identify as Catholic do not all follow the same rules or believe the same things.  Making blanket statements about people of faith becomes a lot more difficult when readers begin to see the wide range of beliefs people hold.

YA needs more religious characters–and not only characters grappling with issues like the Catholic sexual abuse scandal.  Characters who are going about their lives, saving the world, traveling through space, doing what YA characters typically do–just while having a religion.  Books are supposed to expand our minds, to help us walk in another person’s shoes.  So why should religion be taboo?  If we only opened to YA to more characters of faith, surely we would find that religion is not that scary.

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62 thoughts on “Is Religion YA’s Last Taboo?

  1. Kate @ everywhere and nowhere says:

    It’s a very good point there are so many people who are religious that aren’t extreme about it who unfortunately get lumped in with all the horror stories that you hear. I think the reason that it still might be a subject that writers aren’t keen on approaching is because it isn’t all that long ago that it was one of the institutions that they was rising up against. It is due to religion that many people see anyone on the LGBTQ+ spectrum as being ‘other’ or ‘freaks’ which generates a lot of hate and to be honest being religious was the mainstream thing, to go against it was what made you a freak.

    My Gran and Grampa got married even though she was Christian and he was Catholic and their families didn’t speak to them for a long time, they were essentially shamed for loving who they wanted to, my Gran didn’t go to church for years because she felt like she wasn’t accepted by her own religion. Now that as a society we are more accepting she has been able to go back. We’re just not far enough past stories like this and those that are more extreme for it to not be a contentious topic.

    I think the way people practise their religion has changed in many ways for the better and I know plenty of religious people who have all the same interests as I do but they have faith as an extra, I still feel though that there are still some parts of any religion that are oppressive and that do breed negativity and that is probably why it’s such a hard topic to broach. Until certain religions or religious practices evolve to be more universally accepting I think unfortunately it’s going to stay that way.

    Great post 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Krysta says:

      Well, the interesting thing about the article is that Freitas discusses how, even though her religious beliefs have changed over the years, she’s still interested in many of the philosophical questions religion raises–she was just made to feel ashamed of it. And many teens are likely feeling the same way. They may have questions or be interested, but they’re being made to feel like being interested in religion or the questions it raises makes them bad people. But I think representing religion more in YA would show that the vast majority of people are not hateful or extremists.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kate @ everywhere and nowhere says:

        I agree I think to be able to steer away from hurtful stereotypes there need to be new stories. I also feel though that it won’t happen until the teens of now that are religious find themselves in a position to be able to do something about it, i.e. become writers or get jobs in publishing to try and change the narrative.

        YA has become somewhat an industry if you think of all the books that are now huge franchises, with films and toys and clothing ranges and, unfortunately, religion doesn’t have the best past reputation. If you are a publisher you aren’t always thinking about what represents the most people your thinking about what will sell universally and what could damage your brand, so it will take new people to change that mould.

        Like

  2. Enobong says:

    I’m glad this is being spoken about because it’s something that I did notice as a christian teenager trying to find books that had some of representation of what I was going through. A lot of YA books and TV shows depict sleeping around and falling in bed with friends and friend’s boyfriends as the norm, which if fine if that is the author’s choice, but I think this should be balanced with books that also show another point of view. It’s time for YA writers and publishers to break through the religion taboo.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

      I was actually just talking with someone about how YA has a huge “sex positivity” bent that is only getting stronger in terms of characters sleeping with multiple people, sleeping with them just for fun outside of relationships, etc. Except statistics show that teens are basically not having sex with each other, and that’s not even because of any religious reasons. So having a sex positivist message is one thing, but I think it’s very interesting that this representation largely will not feel “relatable” to teens–who are not having sex at all and, for all I know, don’t necessarily want to. It seems kind of like a message being pushed by people my age (millennials) because they think it’s something teens “should” think or do, rather than a thoughtful reflection of how today’s teens are actually experiencing life.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Enobong says:

        That’s very interesting. So really it’s an attitude being pushed on teens in the same way that some are surmising that writing about religion will push certain attitudes and ideas on teens. Very interesting indeed.

        Like

  3. Mel says:

    This was a very interesting article. I’m not sure if I agree with everything but it’s definitely an important issue to think about and you bring up a lot of interesting points!

    Like

  4. CHARIS RAE @ charisrae.com says:

    As a Christian myself, I love this and totally agree! It seems perfectly fine when characters reject God/religion but when there’s a character who does believe in God it’s suddenly preachy and a huge issue. Pretty hypocritical imo. I definitely want to see more religious rep in books and show the different voices and perspectives within all of them. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Briana | Pages Unbound says:

      I think the only Christian YA characters I’ve seen have been side character who are preachy AND hypocrites, and then I guess readers are supposed to pump their fists and revel in the fact that religious people are annoying liars or something. I wouldn’t mind a wider variety of religious representation. Surely it’s not too much to ask that authors actually take the idea of religion seriously.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Krysta says:

      I constantly find it interesting that people today often are against “moralizing” stories or stories with “messages”, but they only mean stories with certain morals or messages. Children’s literature is actually full of messages like body positivity, sex positivity, feminism, tolerance, etc. And people are okay with that because they agree with those messages.

      In the same way, there are many YA books that seem to be giving the message that being religious equates with being bad or at least a freak. And you don’t really see anyone saying that’s potentially a problem. Because I think a lot of people agree with that message. But then we’re saying that YA is only for certain readers and that teens who feel religious are not welcome. But that contradicts the call for being inclusive and tolerant.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. MoMo @ Remnants of Wit says:

    I really liked how in Miles Morales: Spider-Man by Jason Reynolds, it was mentioned that Miles was Catholic and at one point he was wanting to go to confession. The author left it there without making a big thing of it in a book that wasn’t about religion. I remember thinking that other YA authors should follow this example! This is a great and timely post, thanks for sharing.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      That’s a great example! People sometimes seem to fear that a religious character is always going to make a sermon about the superiority of their religion. That’s not the case at all! Just like people in real life don’t typically do that!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. honestavocado says:

    Yes, I agree wholeheartedly. That is one thing I loved about the TV show Lost, I felt they did a good job of showing a diversity of beliefs and religions in their characters in a way I hadn’t seen in other shows. (This came to mind because I’ve been binge-watching it recently). But it surprised me at first and then I had to stop and ask myself why that would be a surprise. Probably because usually if it’s not a show or book written explicitly by an author from that religion I rarely expect to see any depiction of characters with those beliefs. Hopefully that will change!

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      That’s so funny! I just started watching Lost! I’m only four or five episodes in, but I was interested in seeing a diverse cast and I’m hoping we’ll see more of the “side” characters go along. (I feel like Jack and Kate are the main characters, even though it’s sort of an ensemble show). But, you’re right. Often when a character is religious, it’s easy to assume they’re the same religion as the author because, well, most authors don’t seem invested in representing characters of faith.

      Liked by 1 person

      • honestavocado says:

        They have like 5 main characters but that changes throughout the show a bit (and Jack and Kate are two of them). Do you know of any books that you think represented characters of faith particularly well?

        Like

        • Krysta says:

          Ooh interesting! I’m looking forward to watching more!

          It’s actually pretty difficult for me to think of books with characters of faith! I really like Chaim Potok, though he doesn’t write YA. (But I think The Chosen, for instance, could appeal to YA readers.) He writes Jewish characters. And I really love Ms. Marvel, who is Muslim. But thinking of religious characters who aren’t in fantasy worlds isn’t easy!

          Liked by 1 person

  7. Kim says:

    I used to read some Christian YA when I was a teen, so I cant say faith based YA isn’t out there. The trouble with specifically Christian YA however, is that it is inevitably a little preachy. I dont think writers or publishers of this YA subgenre can do much to avoid this since sharing faith through writing is kind of the idea for them. Not to say Christian YA was bad. A personal favorite of mine was “Left Behind: The Kids,” a spin off of the Left Behind series by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins that centers around the apocalypse as depicted in the bible. Great disaster survival story.

    What I want to see is what you have described here. Mainstream YA featuring characters who just happen to be of a faith or belief system, and how that aspect of who they are changes how they handle the problem(s) in the plot. Even better if there is a contrasting character alongside them who is strictly secular.

    Unfortunately, mainstream publishers likely fear that this wouldn’t sell, and an author who tries to write it will probably have to turn to a faith based publisher to have their work put out there. Of course its also possible that the faith based publisher will refuse to publish such a story if it has elements their faith wishes to avoid focusing on.

    Catch 22 that needs to change.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Yeah, the thing about Christian fiction is that it isn’t mainstream. It’s relegated to its own section and you have to seek it out. I also have a friend who reads it and she says someone usually makes a sermon, and I can imagine that would be off-putting to many readers. Also, Christian fiction usually means Protestant fiction and I’ve been told some is anti-Catholic, which isn’t very inclusive. Obviously, Christian fiction is popular, though–enough to warrant its own section in many bookstores. You don’t typically see the Jewish fiction section, for instance, in Barnes and Noble.

      I do suspect that authors are not writing characters of faith partially because they fear publishers wouldn’t accept it. That needs to change. But pressure would have to be put on publishers for that change and they’d have to be persuaded characters of faith could sell.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kim says:

        I agree on both counts. Especially the lack of fiction for religions outside of Christianity.

        I find it odd that YA in particular seems to have this problem. Other areas of fiction are far more liberal in regard to religion. Fantasy for example, almost always features belief systems and religions that affect how characters interact with their world. Even horror has the stereotypical priest who helps fight off all the evil.

        It’s like publishers of YA fear teens cant possibly handle being exposed to other belief systems outside of mainstream society or perhaps even their own religion. Isn’t one if the advantages of reading all about opening minds to new things people might not otherwise explore in their day to day life? It’s sad that omitting religion is even a thing.

        Like

        • Krysta says:

          I think YA could be an exceptional case because children’s literature has always been closely regulated in regards to what is “appropriate” for children and teens to read. So if we don’t see religion being included in YA, it is possible that people with power somehow decided at some point that teens shouldn’t be exposed to different religious viewpoints because it might be harmful or damaging to them. I can’t prove this, of course, but that’s my guess. Adults are presumably capable of handling content like religion whereas teens need to be “protected” from it. For some reason.

          Either that, or publishers somehow decided religion was a sure way to destroy book sales. Perhaps because they feared audiences would think religion an inappropriate topic to be include in teen books.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Kim says:

            For sure. Both are very real possibilities. It’s funny, when I was a teen I was reading everything fron Goosebumps and Sweet Valley High to Stephen King and Ann Rice. Reading literature with mature content as a teen didn’t have any effects on my development. I think teens can handle a little religious diversity. How can we expect well rounded, open minded, and inclusive adults to develop from sheltered teens? It’s nice to see posts like this question what seems to be a status quo 🙂 That’s where change starts.

            Liked by 2 people

  8. Mattie @ Living Mattie says:

    Totally agree. This is a fantastic discussion post and it is a really important topic! Have you read Heretics Anonymous? I personally found that to be a fascinating book – it contains main characters with all sorts of different beliefs: there’s a Catholic, a Jew, an atheist and two more that I can’t quite remember? I think one is something pagan or a witch? Sorry, I can’t quite remember, but that was a really really interesting depiction of religion in YA. Would recommend.

    Like

  9. Grab the Lapels says:

    I remember reading somewhere that if a person loses his or her faith, it will most likely happen in the later years of college. That makes sense; perhaps they’re reevaluating their faith when encountered with other religions and philosophies, and are no longer around parents, who are often the ones who dictate their children’s faith. Therefore, it makes sense that more young adults would be people of faith.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      That’s a good point. Also, even if people are identifying as less religious, I think teens are still interested in the types of questions religion often raises such as, why am I here? What is my purpose in life? How can I be the best version of myself? Teens are thoughtful! They think philosophically!

      Like

      • Grab the Lapels says:

        I think the question I always have is “Am I missing out?” I mean, especially with so many Facebook memes about knowing God will see a person through, I have to wonder: AM I MISSING OUT.

        Like

        • Krysta says:

          That’s a good point. Some people seem to have very moving experiences and/or to find a lot of meaning in their religions. I do sometimes wonder what it is they are experiencing!

          Liked by 1 person

  10. louloureads says:

    I have read some Christian fiction (for adults and teenagers) and have found a *lot* of it really poorly written, which has put me off.

    However, when I was about 11, I remember really loving Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, in which the main character is trying to figure out her faith (she’s from a Jewish family). And Judy Blume was pretty much the originator of YA as a genre.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Yeah, my friend reads Christian fiction and it seems like a lot of it is actually preachy and some is anti-Catholic, which isn’t exactly the inclusive perspective I’m advocating for here. I would like to see religion represented in more mainstream books, where readers don’t have to go to a specific section in the bookstore to be exposed to different beliefs. And great point about Judy Blume!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. MetalPhantasmReads says:

    Thank you Krysta! This means a lot to me personally. I don’t like how religion has been shown in YA recently with being “preachy.” It’s how people talk and be persistent is when it gets preachy. I know there are religious teens that would feel seen if it was included more often; we are getting books with showing Jewish and Muslim characters but we can go further than that. I always think you two create such great discussions better than me lol. Amazing post 😀

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Awhile ago I saw a list of books with Jewish characters. I had only heard of a few of the titles! So maybe we are seeing more books with religious characters, but perhaps they’re not getting a lot of attention? YA is committed to being more inclusive in recent years. Hopefully the inclusiveness will extend to characters of faith!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Beware Of The Reader says:

    Great topic here! That’s also why I loved A Very large Expanse of Sea by Tahere mafi. Because she spoke about islam and about women practicing Islam. It was eye opening as indeed we don’t get enough YA books broaching this topic! I think the world would be better if we read more about it because we would feel familiar and not so threatened by something we don’t know or perceive through what the media tell us!

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Thanks for the recommendation! And yes! Exactly! People seem to fear religion. Perhaps they wouldn’t if they understood different religions more!

      Like

  13. kozbisa says:

    I have been reading more books, which incorporate religious minorities in a positive way, but Christianity still seems to be depicted mostly in negative ways. I think I read three books, which featured Jewish characters, and they practiced their religion, which was nice to see.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Yeah, I’ve seen some great lists of recommended books with Jewish characters! And I have seen more books with Muslim characters, which is exciting. Now we need to keep this momentum going and see more characters of faith! All kinds!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Kelly | Another Book in the Wall says:

    THIS is the post I have been wanting to see for so long! Thank you bringing this into discussion, Krysta! ❤️ I too, feel that speaking of religion or having characters be religious are a sort of taboo in the YA genre. It’s such a shame, because as you mentioned, there are many people, and teenagers especially who seek to find themselves represented in books. Not all religious characters need to be depicted as preachy or hypocritical.

    This is an absolutely lovely discussion! ❤️

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Yeah, I have seen people fear that ANY mention of religion is preachy. I don’t think so! I think religion naturally raises many philosophical questions teens want to engage with, like “Why am I here?” and “How do I live my best, most meaningful life?” Teens are thoughtful! They care! Why not have literature that reflects this?

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Sammie @ The Writerly Way says:

    Man, this is such a great post! I think about this all the time. It’s why I personally love certain books like The Star-Crossed Queen, where you’re immersed in the religion through the book, but it’s not, like, a religious textbook, you know?

    I feel like it’s so important, especially in the YA range, to know that people do have religions (or not, even) and the whole spectrum is fine. They’re still people. You can still love the badass Muslim character just as much as the badass Catholic, etc.

    I am noticing more of it, but it seems slow to gain traction. I mentioned The Star-Crossed Queen, which is based on Hindu myths, and in general, a lot of Roshani Chokshi’s work focuses on Hinduism. Children of Blood and Bone was huge this year, and that focuses a bit on the Yoruba (though, not as much as I had hoped, but still, maybe it’ll spark something). Rebel of the Sands isn’t specifically about Islam, but there are some heavy (and quite obvious) Islamic influences. The Astonishing Color of After has a lot of Buddhist and Taoist elements, especially involving the afterlife. So like I said, I think it’s just on the cusp of becoming a “thing” and it’s something I very much look forward to. It’s just not quite there yet.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      Ooh, I love that you brought us some religions that don’t receive as much attention. I think it would be really cool if we could have characters of all kinds of faiths, especially the ones that people maybe don’t think about a lot and aren’t familiar with. Even though religion doesn’t seem widely represented, I’m sure it’s easier to find books about Christian, Jewish, and Muslim characters than it is to find a book with a Buddhist character, for instance.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Sammie @ The Writerly Way says:

        I sort of really made it my goal towards the end of last year (and hopefully, even more so this year) to read more diverse books, even though they’re kind of hard to find around here. (Thank goodness for eBay and Book Depository haha). So I think I tend to see more influence of other cultures in books just because of that.

        Muslim feels like a more recent thing, too, but there’s certainly a good number of them out and about now. But I would definitely agree. It takes pretty much no effort at all to find things with Christian, Jewish, or even Muslim influence. I feel like Christian seems to be the default in most literature from the US (which is what I’m most familiar with), which is fine. But also I live in the South, and my book club reads A LOT of books with a heavy Christian influence, and I’m a little bit over it at this point. xD

        You know what I want to see that I haven’t? And if anyone has recommendations, I would love it. I want a book based on paganism, in whatever form that takes, especially with Celtic lore/mythology. And since being let down by Children of Blood and Bone, I’m really dying for a book that actually delves more into the Yoruba, because they are hardcore, man. I’ve read some of the lore and stories, and it’s fantastic and brutal and funny and just … why are more people not writing about this pantheon of gods?!

        Like

      • Sammie @ The Writerly Way says:

        You’re more than welcome! I hope you enjoy them. 🙂 I loved all of them except Children of Blood and Bone, which I felt was just all right (I’m clearly in the minority on that one, though). And I highly recommend A Crown of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi, which is even better than The Star-Crossed Queen.

        And if you’re looking for others, Shadow of the Fox by Julie Kagawa was great for Japanese culture/beliefs (and read very much like an anime, which as an anime fan was super exciting). Oh! I even read one last year about a cult religion (which is still religion, I guess, and fascinating and terrifying in its own way) called After The Fire by Will Hill. That was really good and based on the Waco Siege.

        Like

  16. Whiskey Black says:

    Wow! I never realized this was an issue. Of course, I’ve kinda been out of the YA loop for a few years, but I’m working my way back in, whoo hoo!
    I agree I think more characters should have religions, or lack thereof, and have struggles surrounding them in novels. When I read this, 3 YA books from my teen years in the 90’s popped into my head. I’m guessing this is part of the reason I didn’t realize it was an issue.

    In Christopher Pike’s 1990 novel, SATI, spirituality is the main focus of the story. It centers around a girl named Sati, who might just be God, and how she impacts the lives of the strangers she comes to know as friends. It wasn’t one I read back then, but I only just came to read it a few years ago. Had I read it back when I was a teen it would’ve felt like blasphemy & I wouldn’t have been able to fully appreciate it for the amazing novel that it is.
    His series, THE LAST VAMPIRE, involves Hinduism. Again spirituality plays a major role in the vampire mythos & how the MC, Sita, struggles with her own faith & her promise to Lord Krishna, as well as her relationship with him.
    And If memory serves, I’m pretty sure that his REMEBER ME trilogy also discusses reincarnation.
    I’ve also noticed a…”trend” of having characters attend Catholic schools, or even be churchgoers, but the religion aspect never really comes into play at all.

    Like

  17. theorangutanlibrarian says:

    Such a brilliant post! I can only echo what you said here: I think it’s actually important that YA breaks this taboo. Religion is definitely something authors largely leave out of YA- and I only ever see it being mentioned in a negative light/as something to overcome. I’ve grown up with a lot of religious people and (like most people) have many religious- it’s just not reflective of reality to remove religion from YA.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Yeah, I’ve seen religion mentioned largely negatively and I don’t understand it. A good number of people are religious. Do these authors really think so condescendingly of the religious people they know in their own lives?

      Like

  18. Elise @thebookishactress says:

    really excellent post and point, Krysta! I think a lot of the religion in YA books tends to be portrayed negatively for some of the same reasons parents are often portrayed badly – because it’s an issue teens sometimes grapple with, so it’s written about. But there’s a lot of danger in only having one story to tell about teens, and religion needs to be talked about in all its contexts – especially positive, because that’s what we’ve lacked.

    I just read this book called You Asked For Perfect that used the main character’s Judaism as a simple part of his life and I appreciated it so much! Have you heard of it?

    Like

  19. Malka @ Paper Procrastinators says:

    This is something that constantly frustrates me! I’ll hear about a book with religious rep, but it’s always used in the same way, to set the character aside as other, instead of being a part of that character’s life. It frustrates me to no end! I can’t wait for the day when religious rep is as seamlessly fit into the story as so many other pieces already are right now.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Yeah, it would be nice to see more characters who are religious naturally, instead of being marked as weird outsiders. Plenty of people are religious. This shouldn’t be difficult! I’ve seen more understanding for murderers in YA than I have for people of faith.

      Like

  20. Charvi says:

    Wow, I hadn’t really thought much about this but you’re absolutely correct. We could be reading so much about religions in books! I’m somewhat of an atheist myself but I love reading about people from other religions and their practices. I can only hope we see more of it in books in the future.

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      I feel like there’s so much for me to learn about all kinds of religions and beliefs and it would be really awesome to see some depictions in literature! Hopefully, we’ll get there one day!

      Like

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