Ten Interesting Posts of the Week (2/10/19)

Post Round-Up

Around the blogosphere

  1. May discusses lack of appreciation for book bloggers.
  2. Kelly discusses the importance of teen bloggers (and starts a directory).
  3. Ellyn shares her 10 step guide to growing your blog.
  4. Offbeat YA asks what misconceptions you had about blogging when you started.
  5. Dale writes about the “hidden lives” of George Eliot’s Middlemarch.
  6. Ellyn tells us how she feels about J.K. Rowling adding to Harry Potter canon.
  7. Margaret shares 6 things she learned in her first year of book blogging.
  8. The New York Times featured two authors’ thoughts on having their books called out on social media.
  9. Epic Reads lists places you can donate your books.
  10. Chasm of Books recommends 7 books from your backlist you should read this year.

At Pages Unbound

 

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17 thoughts on “Ten Interesting Posts of the Week (2/10/19)

  1. Ellyn says:

    Thank you so much for mentioning my posts, I’m glad you liked them!
    I’ll definitely have to check out all the other posts on your list! πŸ’•

    Like

  2. Grab the Lapels says:

    When I saw that NYT article, I raced for it. I’m not sure how much book bloggers and social media critics read dystopian literature from the past, such as Brave New World, 1984, Fahrenheit 451, and Animal Farm, but the mob mentality that I see on Twitter over books scares me the same way those dystopian stories do. I’m especially scared of the people who won’t read a book but criticize it with the same hatred and anger as if they had been personally assaulted.

    The first author to explain what happened to her wrote carefully and respectfully. The second author was pretty flippant, turning the conversation to that ho-hum story about coddled millennials that I find both rude and shallow for its lack of thought–not sensitivity, but thought.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dale says:

    Thank you very much for including my post! And also thanks for pointing me to the NYT article – thought-provoking and a little disturbing.

    Like

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