The Sunday Exchange (10/21/18): Share a Post about One of Your Favorite Authors

Sunday Exchange

Introduction

The Sunday Exchange is a new weekly feature we are introducing at Pages Unbound where we ask you, our readers, to share a post from your own blog that matches the week’s theme.  The goal is to allow you to share posts you are proud of or think other people will find interesting and to help other people find fun posts to read.

This Week’s Theme

Share a Post about One of Your Favorite Authors

The “Rules”

  1. Share your post title, the URL of the post, AND a brief explanation of what the post is/why you think people might like to read it in a comment on this blog post.
  2. Try to make the post fit the week’s theme.
  3. Please share only one post each week.
  4. The post does not have to be recent. It can be from any time in your blog’s archives.
  5. Consider visiting some other bloggers’ posts.
  6. We won’t be closing the comments after a week has passed, so *technically* you can still add your post later, but it may not get that much traffic if you share your post a month later.

That’s it! We hope you participate, and check back next Sunday for a new theme and another chance to share!

Star Divider

A Post We Recommend at Pages Unbound

5 Things You Didn't Know about Dante's Inferno

Dante’s Inferno Isn’t What You Think It Is

Just to mix things up, I’m featuring Dante this time instead of Tolkien! Dante can often appear intimidating to readers.  However, I think he has a lot to say to contemporary readers about human nature, sin, politics, philosophy, and more.  So if you’re hesitant to approach Dante, here are some things to know about his work before you dive in!

16 thoughts on “The Sunday Exchange (10/21/18): Share a Post about One of Your Favorite Authors

  1. Jenna @ Falling Letters says:

    Okay, I think I finally have a good post that fits the theme! I will pick up the Tolkien that you’ve left out for this week and share “Response: Literary Pilgrimages”. I wrote about my trip to Oxford (back in 2013!), the purpose of which was primarily to pay tribute to Tolkien. I explain why the trip was important to me and describe various Tolkien-related places I visited.

    https://fallingletters.ca/2014/05/response-literary-pilgrimages.html

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      This sounds so amazing! I’m glad you shared your experience with us–and your photographs! I’ve never been to Oxford, but I imagine it would indeed be indescribable.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. mgerardmingo says:

    Yesterday, I finally got out of my blogging slump by diving into the work of one of my favorite poets, James Wright. Specifically, I took a look at “Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio,” which features one of his trademark arresting endings. It’s one of Wright’s triumphs as a poet of the post-industrial Midwest.

    Title: James Wright’s “Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio”: An Analysis
    Link: mgerardmingo.com/2018/10/20/james-wrights-autumn-begins-in-martins-ferry-ohio-an-analysis/

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Michael J. Miller says:

    “The Mighty Thor and the Nature of God”

    https://mycomicrelief.wordpress.com/2017/07/30/the-mighty-thor-and-the-nature-of-god/

    Jason Aaron’s storyline where Jane Foster picks up the hammer and becomes Thor herself contains some of my all time favorite comics, in part because of the elegance in how he uses theology in these stories. This post explores one arc and how Aaron uses a comic about hammer and sword wielding alien gods to examine our history of seeking the transcendent.

    Liked by 1 person

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