Feeling Like You Read the “Wrong” Books

 

feeling like you read the wrong books discussion

In the book blogosphere, we tend to hear about how people feel shamed for reading YA.  Interestingly, however, YA books are the one group that I can feel pretty comfortable admitting to reading.  After all, its huge expansion in recent years is a testament to how popular–and how financially successful–it is as an age range. Thus, when I meet a new person and they ask what I am reading, I can typically assume that, if I choose one book from the five I am currently immersed in, the YA book will, statistically, give me a better chance of making a connection or at least make me look kind of “normal.”  True, there are those who will mock me for reading YA or those who also read YA, but hurriedly add that it’s “just for fun” or “a guilty pleasure” or that they need “some mindless entertainment to relax,” but “they’re also reading some Foucault right now, too.”  But, by and large, YA seems to be more accepted than many other types of books.

The strange thing is, I’ve noticed that, no matter what I say I am reading, I almost always end up feeling like I admitted to reading the “wrong” type of book.  Sometimes it’s just because the other person has more specific interests than I do (for instance, only reading fantasy and nothing else) and I sadly chose to tell them that I was reading Charles Dickens rather than J. R. R. Tolkien.  Other times, I end up feeling shamed for reasons I sometimes can’t articulate to myself–because the person didn’t say anything outright.  They just made a “joke” or kind of gave me a weird look or paused too long before responding.  I have to admit that the “What are you reading?” question actually makes me panic a little now.  In my head, the possible consequences for saying I read each type of book look something like t his:

Admitting I Read Classics

Now the person thinks I am stuck up, showing off, or suggesting that I am more intellectual/somehow better than they are.  They might now feel inferior or defensive based on their own reading choices.

Admitting I Read Fantasy

They now think I am a nerd.  They’re wondering if I dress up in costumes and if I can speak Elvish–and not because they think those are fun things to do.

Admitting I Read Middle Grade

They can’t figure out why I’m reading such “juvenile” books as an adult and consequently now think I’m weird, unintelligent, or unable to leave my childhood behind in a proper way.

Admitting I Read Picture Books

They’re going to ask if I teach or have some sort of “project” and when I say I think picture books are valid pieces of art for adults to read for themselves, they’re just going to stare at me.

Admitting I Read Graphic Novels

I’ll get the same reaction I’ll get if I admit I read MG.

Admitting I Read Nonfiction

They think I’m super serious and super boring.  They possibly also think I’m setting myself up as intellectually superior.

Ultimately, answering the question “What do you read?” feels like a no-win situation in a way that answering a question like “What is the last movie you saw?” does not. Perhaps it’s because there are only a limited number of films in theatres and I can assume that anything I name will have been something the other person has also seen or at least heard of–making it less weird. I, in essence, look far more mainstream, more like the “average” person.  But when it comes to books, there are so many published that it seems almost impossible to make a connection with a new acquaintance based on naming a book.  The conversation becomes too fraught and somehow they always seem to be making sweeping judgments based on my moral character and identity as a person just because I said I’m currently reading the Keeper of the Lost Cities series.

I don’t let others change my reading habits just because they don’t like what I do or are critical of my book choices.  Still, I sometimes wish that it were easier to discuss books with people.  I wish that having literary conversations could be a positive experience where I learn about new books and can share excitement with another book lover–even if we’re excited about different genres.  But, somehow, I’ve never really had that experience in-person. And I’m wondering why.

Do you experience judgment when admitting to reading or liking certain books?

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69 thoughts on “Feeling Like You Read the “Wrong” Books

  1. Carrie @ Cat on the Bookshelf says:

    I feel judged for what I read, but I’m less phased by it since I took a children’s lit class. I think there’s less judgement if you read a currently popular book, like 13 Reasons Why when the show is a major topic in conversation and online. I don’t know how to really start those conversations, but I think it can start with asking each other and even reading in public because someone will ask what you’re reading.

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    • Krysta says:

      Yeah, books do tend to be popular when films come out. A Wrinkle in Time is currently flying off the shelves.

      People ask me what I’m reading all the time. They just generally don’t seem to like my answer. ;b

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  2. Beware Of The Reader says:

    Hi Krysta great perceptive yet funny post. Rae Carson wrote something like “Be it Twilight or FSOG never let others make you feel ashamed of your read”. I don’t feel it or not often as I try to convince (read push down the throat) the other to just READ IT. So I can be pushy with books I live.

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    • Krysta says:

      I’m not sure I’ve ever managed to convince a judgmental person to read a book I like, sadly. I do try to suggest that they should read the book and then come back with an opinion based on that reading, but I guess they figure they know what they like and what I’m reading isn’t it. ;b

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  3. Holly says:

    I definitely feel this way a lot. The majority of what I read are classics and non-fiction, which tends to make me sound like I’m trying to sounds smart or “well read” or something like that. In reality, those are just the books that I love to read!! Thanks for talking about this topic 🙂

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    • Krysta says:

      It’s funny because I see people worrying about reading YA but I feel more judged when I tell someone that my favorite authors include Shakespeare and Dante. I think, in the end, it just feels like I lose no matter what I say!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      Interesting! I don’t read crime novels (I tend to like happy things, so maybe the “cozy mystery” section is for me??) so I don’t know what would happen if I talked about those!

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      • ireadthatinabook says:

        In my experience they are comparatively neutral starting points, at least in Sweden. They count as Proper Adult Books so serious readers won’t look too much down on you but are still very popular and many non-readers may have seen the TV-version (there is almost always a TV-series…) and thus will not be too badly intimidated.

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        • Krysta says:

          I love that! “Proper Adult Books.” That’s exactly what people seem to want us to be reading! 😀

          I think crime novels are pretty popular in the U.S., too. At least, I see a lot being checked out of the library. I don’t know about TV series, though. I feel like there’s huge section of pop culture I’m missing….

          Liked by 1 person

          • ireadthatinabook says:

            I believe almost every popular Swedish crime fiction series have been made into a TV-series or film or something at one point or another. I suspect that they are not too expensive to make and usually get good viewer numbers so they are a safe choice for the TV-companies.

            I guess there’s almost always large parts of pop culture that we are missing. I find it sort of inspiring, all those large sections of culture I have yet to find.

            Liked by 1 person

  4. Bree says:

    For a long time I felt ashamed about admitting that I love Romance novels and honestly it was only recently that I was like, “why am I shaming myself for what brings me joy?” I’ve finally embraced what I like and unabashedly respond to the, “what kind of books do you like to read?” Question with, “ALL THE ROMANCE NOVELS!!”

    So unabashedly, in fact, that I created a blog that is all romance all the time. Because it’s what I love.

    I’ve also stopped apologizing and making excuses for the music I like to listen to and the movies I like to watch.

    I guess I just figured, what’s the point? I am who I am and two people don’t have to have everything in common to be friends. Actually, it’s better to have a diverse group of friends with different viewpoints and opinions. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      That sounds like a great attitude! Hopefully you’ve found some more romance readers out there!

      And I think you’re right. People don’t need to read the same things to be friends! That’s why I find Facebook stalking weird. You can’t actually determine whether your relationship will work out based on what music someone listens to… It is possible a country fan and a rock fan will make it work. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  5. ofmariaantonia says:

    I love the story in one of C.S. Lewis’ books (Surprised by Joy, maybe?) where he talks about how he became friends with Arthur Greeves. He goes over to visit Arthur who is sickly. Lewis happens to see a book on mythology lying on the bed. He’s like “Wait? You like myths, too?!” It was the realization that he had met a kindred spirit.

    Personally, I’ve found that I tailor my “What I read” list to the person I’m talking to. I love MG and YA, but I don’t often admit this to most adults. Which, in a way, is kind of sad. But I’ve have seen too many of those condescending looks you mention in the post. But the moment I find an Arthur Greeves, watch out. We’ll be thick as thieves.

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  6. TheSociologicalMail says:

    Great post and I completely agree. I tend to read classic and non fiction, but I enjoy everything. Non the less when I tell people I usually prepare myself for an adverse reaction.

    Even worst is when I’m judged for being a reader all in all, like I heard a young man at work once say ‘I don’t understand people who read, I’ve never finished a book in my life’. Yeah….awkward.

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    • Krysta says:

      That’s a good point. Plenty of people like various types of books! It’s weird to judge someone based on the one thing they happen to be reading at the moment!

      Yeah, I know a lot of people like that but all I can think is, “So…what do you do with your time?” Because a book is my go-to when waiting in line or having lunch or whatever. I can’t imagine not reading!

      I like to think that some people just haven’t found the book that speaks to them yet. But I guess it is difficult to find that book if you aren’t reading at all.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Dalindcy Koolhoven says:

    I also feel judged for what I read no matter what I read. I don’t read a ton of YA, mostly classics, adult fiction and non-fiction, but people in my day-to-day life are always kind of ”oh, ok then” when I tell them reading is one of my favorite hobbies. I guess (I now realize while writing this) I don’t feel judged for reading a specific type of book, but I feel judged for reading (for pleasure) in general. I’m scared people will think I feel smarter/better than them or that I’m super nerdy and awkward, even if I have zero reason to believe that.

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    • Krysta says:

      Yes, I’ve gotten that reaction to. People who don’t read seem to rub it in my face all the time that I do. Which is odd. I don’t go around constantly alluding to the fact that people crochet or snowboard or whatever they do as a hobby. It’s not like that defines them completely! It’s just something they like to do!

      I’ve also had a fair amount of people tell me how much they love to read, too, etc. Then I find out later they barely read. Which is fine. But if someone hasn’t read a book for two years, why are they acting like they read all the time? Are they trying to impress me? Are they worried I will judge THEM? I don’t really care if people don’t read, even though I find it an alien concept. We can talk about other things and still have a friendship….

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      • Dalindcy Koolhoven says:

        Yes! What you said about how other people tell you they read also rings very true to me. I think sometimes people do try to impress.. Although I have no idea why people would try to impress me personally, but they’ll pretend they have read a book but then when you try to discuss something from the book they don’t know what you’re talking about. It’s awkward really, there is no shame in not having read a specific book!

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        • Krysta says:

          Yeah, that has happened to me a lot. I don’t understand. Just admit you haven’t read the book. I’m going to figure out in about 30s if you haven’t and then it will be awkward for both of us. 😉

          Liked by 1 person

  8. karen blue says:

    Hmm, no one has usually read what I tell them I am reading. Like, usually non book people ask me and they are fishing for recommendations so I always give my best excitedly given review along with the book. I don’t get people asking me in the bookish community, we usually just discuss books there.
    I do admit that talking about the wrong book is not good. That’s why I always ask “what kind of books do you like?” before I give my answer. That’s cheating, I know.

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    • Krysta says:

      It is disappointing when you’re talking to someone and neither of you has read what the other one has. Usually I try to get them to tell me about the book they’re reading, but it seems a lot of people don’t know how to talk about a book without more common ground. But I’m interested in learning about books I haven’t read!

      That’s sneaky, but a good strategy!

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  9. Ali says:

    See I don’t have this problem anymore. Thank god! When I first started blogging I did though and it drove me nuts. Growing up my parents were really cool about reading, they never censored anything I read, (Which is what I do for my kids) so when I was younger I never felt bad for any of my reading. Then I got older and people would look at me funny for reading YA. I just tried my best to ignore it. After awhile I found out about blogging/reviewing and I was in heaven.

    When it comes to talking about books, I always tend to ask what kind of book they like first before recommending any to them.

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    • Krysta says:

      I find it odd people think adults shouldn’t read YA or that adults don’t read why. The last time someone did a study, it was 2012, and 55% of YA was bought by adults and 28% was purchased by adults 30-44. Basically, more adults are (or at least were) buying YA than teens.

      Yeah, I do ask what people like to read before giving recommendations. But when they ask me what I like to read, it seems like they always think that I’m reading something weird. 😉

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  10. FranL says:

    I definitely feel like people make assumptions about me based on what I read. But I think a lot of those assumptions are things that I’m projecting because I make assumptions about people based on what they read. Not in a judgemental way. Just that “this person seems to prefer escapist reading, I wonder if they’re stressed” or “I had no idea this person was so into military history”. So I think that they make those assumptions about me. I don’t know that it’s true though. And I also try to remember that just because a person is reading a thriller when I encounter them, that doesn’t mean it’s all that they read! I read a wide variety of books and wouldn’t want to be defined by a single genre. I try to extend that to others as well.

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    • Briana says:

      Yes to your point about the fact that people can read more than one genre! I feel like a lot of judgement comes from assuming someone reads *only* YA or *only* nonfiction or whatever, which is a weird assumption because most people do read a variety of books. You can read YA AND classics, or graphic novels AND thrillers, or whatever.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. winged says:

    Most of my friends read YA, so I’ve stopped feeling so judged by it, though I’m sure I have been. I do feel judged about reading romance novels; I’ve also become more aware that I used to judge romance readers when I was younger and I’m a bit ashamed about that. Romance is one of those genres that’s heavily seen as feminine, frivolous, self-indulgent, etc — it’s a really misogynist viewpoint and I try to stop apologizing for my romance novels!

    Meanwhile one of my friends only reads non-fiction and I’m sure I’ve been judgy about that, haha. “You mean you don’t like ANY fiction”? Oops.

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    • Krysta says:

      In 2012, a study showed that 55% of YA was bought by adults and 28% was purchased by adults 30-44. So I’ve never understood why people think only weird adults read YA. Plus YA is basically the most lucrative segment of the book market because so many people are buying it. It’s almost weirder if someone doesn’t read YA, statistically speaking.

      Yeah, romance is one of the genres that really still isn’t respected. Fantasy and sci-fi are cool now, but romance is still looked down upon–possibly because it’s associated with female writers and readers.

      I know some people who think reading fiction is weird because “it isn’t real” and I can’t comprehend this stance mainly because they all watch fictional movies and I don’t see why fiction is okay in film but not in literature.

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      • winged says:

        To be honest, I’ve never even really seen a difference between adult genre fiction and YA, when the author trusts teenagers with more adult subjects. A lot of the time these days I can’t tell the difference, unless there’s an explicit sex scene in the novel. But I feel like YA is easier to wade through than looking at the entire “fiction” section, and that transitional time period in someone’s life is compelling to write about, so it doesn’t seem odd to me at all that people read it. Yet, sometimes I do get some flak from people as though I’m taking the easy way out. But my impression exactly matches what you’ve said. There may have been a period where authors dumbed down their stories for a younger audience, but I don’t think that’s still a major quality of YA novels.

        I really do think it’s (at least internalized) misogyny, yeah, that keeps people disdainful of romance. It’s sad — sure romance has its flops like every genre, but there are some really good authors writing really interesting things as well.

        Well, I and those people are …mutually baffled, I guess? Haha. I don’t get that either.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. La La in the Library says:

    I have a Music degree and three quarters of a Cinema (do they even call it that anymore) degree and I was just thinking how this also relates to talking about what music and films you watch. I have certain friends who think I am trying to be lofty when I start talking about French films or Jazz, and others whom I would never admit to watching a Jim Carey movie, or listening to AC/DC. Then there is all the tongue clicking a get about primarily being a Metal musician. I am Facebook friends with my college guitar theory and technique instructor and he takes swipes at Metal guitarists all the time. He always comments on my music related posts, but when I posted a video of my current guitar teacher playing a metalized version of the third movement (extremely difficult) of Moonlight Sonata he didn’t comment at all. Ha ha. I was thinking this might be related to things that have Art labels which are also entertainments, but then I started thinking about food and how I would never mention I eat boxed mac and cheese to some of my friends and aquaintances. 😂

    I would think Drugstore Romance novels would be the boxed macaroni and cheese and Sharknado of the literary world? Heh heh. I still tease my sister about her Romance and cozy Mystery reading, but it is all in fun. My mother is kind of a book snob, but she reads some of my sister’s cozies like the Cat Who Mysteries. I do not think she would ever admit publicly to reading them; in fact, I think she was a little ticked off at my sister for telling me she had to postpone going to the library because my mother was still reading one of the Cat Who books. I guess the only judgmental thoughts I have about people’s reading habits is if they always read what is easy for them and never try what I call “thinking books”. I get really upset when I see one and two star reviews on Goodreads for some of the meatier YAs because the story made them have to “think too much”. I always expected my literacy tutees to try new genres and challenge themselves. I guess I see books as a vehicle for personal growth as well as entertainment. At least I’m not as bad as one of my Lit professors who said no one should ever read solely for enjoyment purposes. 😏 Everyone deserves good decompression or comfort comfort read, mine are MG rather than Romances or cozies. ☺

    This was a great discussion post! It made me think about how people judge us by our entertainment choices almost as much as by our lifestyle choices. 👈

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      I’m afraid I don’t know much about music, but, yeah, food can be a difficult topic. My friends who come from homes where everything is organic and homemade have a tendency to make fun of my friends who have homes where they use microwaves and eat vegetables from cans. But so what if someone likes mac and cheese from a box? I don’t see how that affects the life of the other person or why they have to make someone feel bad about liking to eat something.

      Yeah, I see a lot of reviews where the person criticizes the book for being “too hard” and my answer always wants to be, “It isn’t that the book is too hard, but that you haven’t worked your way up to the level of the book yet.” That’s not to shame anyone; I’m sure most of us will one day meet a book that is challenging if we have not already. (Seriously, there are some books I don’t remotely understand, but I don’t always blame the author. Unless they’re a literary theorist in which case I sometimes do wonder if they aren’t really just making stuff up and laughing while they watch other people pretend they can unravel it.) But why not take on the challenge instead of giving up and getting angry at the book?

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      • La La in the Library says:

        We watched a few films in college that my friends and I called “through the legs” movies instead of “over out heads” because they seemed to be complicated just for complication’s sake. Ha. 😂

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  13. Kelly | Just Another Book in the Wall says:

    What a great post! I really relate to this. Most of my friends and acquaintances aren’t avid readers, so whenever I have to answer what I’m reading, I feel judged. If I say a classic they look at me as if I’m stuck-up, and if I say I’m reading YA, they roll their eyes. Perhaps it’s just my imagination, but I feel like most people judge for just being a reader in general.

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    • Krysta says:

      I get that, too. As well as people who pretend that they read more than they do, apparently because they are worried I will judge THEM for their reading (or non-reading) choices. It seems so very silly we can’t just appreciate that we all have different tastes and hobbies!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. kozbisa says:

    I have no shame. I post reviews for books, and a lot of the comments are “I have never heard of this book”. What can I say, I like off the beaten path things. I started reading YA again to connect with my daughter, who has a YA blog, and I read it now (along with MG), because I contribute to her blog. But my favorite books to read are contemporary romances, and romance readers get so much scorn. I don’t care, because those books make me happy and help me enjoy a little escape.

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    • Krysta says:

      Sometimes I think there are too many books. I read over 100 books last year and still didn’t recognize the majority of the books chosen for the Goodreads awards. I can’t keep up apparently!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. theorangutanlibrarian says:

    Honestly, I’ve experienced this problem in so many different circles and I know that so many others do too. When I was at uni, a lot of people on my degree course were afraid to admit to reading anything other than literary fiction or classics (I even remember a friend doing a whole preamble about reading HP). I even remember a professor having a whole rant before a tutorial about how she hates people judging her for reading sci fi and that “it’s a legitimate genre to study!”- I still remember she was shocked when I just said “I agree” after her tirade 😉 That said, in other circles, there can be hostility towards classics. So yeah I really relate to this. Personally, taste is something I never feel it’s worth arguing about, so I don’t know why people bother to judge other people for it (that’s my usual response to people that act like this 😉 well on a good day at least 😉 )

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  16. Never Not Reading says:

    Great Post! I feel like maybe some of it is that people in general read so little that when they meet a bookworm they are already making assumptions about our intellectual superiority, nerdiness, or childishness, so any answer we give just confirms that. However, in my experience the people I meet generally care too little to even say anything other than “oh. Is it good?” They’re really just asking to be polite, I guess.

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  17. Hilary @ SongsWroteMyStory says:

    THIS IS SO TRUE. It’s like you can’t win when it comes admitting what you like to read. Most of the time, I just try not to care, since what really matters is that I’m reading. But sometimes I feel weird as an adult, admitting that I read middle grade and YA, even though I know many adults read those age ranges. Or I feel weird admitting that I love fantasy, even though fantasy is amazing. It’s a work in progress sort of thing, I suppose.

    The worst is when people are like that online, I find. It’s one thing in real life, but another entirely within our community. I hate seeing bloggers judge other bloggers for their reading tastes, when we’re all playing for the same team.

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    • Krysta says:

      MG is especially difficult to admit to reading because even adults who read YA tend to act superior about it. I suspect because they’re feeling awkward about reading “juvenile” literature, they kind of pass the judgment down. So they can say, “At least I read YA, not MG.” But the first couple Harry Potter books are MG and everyone loves those, so it’s a strange position to take, I think.

      Yes, that’s true. You’d think book bloggers would be more inclined to support reading in general! Especially since so many of us apparently feel judged. Why pass that feeling on to someone else? Why discourage someone from reading when it’s somewhat rare for people to read in the first place?

      Liked by 1 person

      • ireadthatinabook says:

        That’s interesting, for me it would be the opposite. With YA I get the impression that people believe you just haven’t moved onto adult literature but that’s rarely the case with MG books. Or perhaps children’s books just have a higher status here. After all dismissing children’s books means dismissing Astrid Lindgren which is Just Not Done.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hilary @ SongsWroteMyStory says:

        It’s so strange to me. MG is awesome, and there are so many good books, and who cares if they’re appropriate for 9-12 year olds so they get categorized there? Given that kids are way harsher critics than adults, I’d think people’s check it out because the quality control needs to be higher to appease to critical children. But whatever.

        Exactly! I guess it’s an ‘us vs. them’ grouping, and feeling the need to belong and what not. But it just seems silly to me, when keeping your mind open is how you find new and good books.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Books, Vertigo and Tea says:

    Wonderful post Krysta that I am sure many need to read! While I am fortunately enough to say that I have encountered very little negative feedback in regards to what I read, the few times I have, it has been for my YA titles. I am not sure when that silly stigma developed. Maybe I am mocked a bit more than I realize because I don’t listen or care, but I know a few blogging friends who have suffered a lot of backlash for the primary focus of their reading and book blogs. It infuriates me.

    Readers should encourage reading! There is no excuses. I have to admit I am silently perturbed with a few bloggers right now who are immensely guilty of attacking the YA community but have now back tracked (after being called out) and claim to support all readers. I know it is childish on my part to still be angry with their behaviour and I should just be thankful that they now seem to understand that behavior is not okay. I will stew on it a bit haha and them forgive them I suppose 😉

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    • Krysta says:

      Exactly! Why would we shame people for their reading choices! That will only encourage them not to read, which seems counterproductive! It’s one thing to recommend something you love and hope someone branches out and tries it, too. Another thing to make them feel bad for what they like to read!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Milliebot says:

    It’s impossible to completely avoid judgement, but I find it mostly comes from people who don’t read often. What I sometimes feel from the book community is that what I’m reading is wrong because it’s NOT YA. Maybe it’s just who I follow, or a trend, but many of the blogs and channels I follow on YouTube are obsessed with ya. I feel like the odd duck cuz I’m reading 80s fantasy or MG and not the latest YA hit.

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    • Krysta says:

      I can see that. YA seems to be the most popular age range in book blogging. I think my MG reviews get about a quarter of the views a YA review might get.

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  20. Kristen @ Metaphors and Moonlight says:

    Tbh, the only people who ask me about what I’m reading are my grandma and this one person who’s like family to me, and they don’t even read themselves. They just know that I do, so they ask because they care about me and my interests. But this did come up recently with some people I’m not that close to, and I did feel kind of stuck because I said I read sci-fi/fantasy, so then they wanted to know what I read cuz one of them reads sci-fi. Except, like you said, there are soooo many books out there, and I read mostly indie/self-pub, so that wasn’t gonna work. Also, I’m pretty sure they would’ve thought it weird if I said I read YA sometimes. They prob would’ve also thought it weird if I said most of the SFF I read is paranormal or has romance. And yeah, GNs still have a stigma too, I’m sure. So yeah, I get it. It’s not a good convo.

    I also feel like, I don’t even know what to call myself for my blog? Because I just say I’m a SFF book blogger. But then do people assume I mean only high fantasy and Tolkien and hard sci-fi and serious stuff? Are the PNR readers judging me for that? Will the high fantasy readers visit my blog and judge me when they see it’s mostly urban and paranormal?

    But I guess it works both ways sometimes. Like you said, if you say you read classics, you feel self-conscious like they’re judging you, but they also feel self-conscious like you’re judging them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      I’ve had new acquaintances ask me what I like to read and I’m secretly convinced my answer ruined potential friendships. But I suppose a friendship wouldn’t work out long term if someone can’t look past the fact that we might like to read different genres….

      That’s a good point about labeling your blog! I usually go “we’re eclectic with a focus on MG, YA, and classics,” but really we do whatever we want. Also a good point that there are so many types of fantasy and sci-fi! I usually don’t read hard sci-fi and feel like that can be a reason sci-fi people don’t take me seriously.

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  21. nicolinesimone says:

    Really great post!! I totally get what you are saying. I too feel diffcult answering the question “what are you reading?”. And when I answer, and maybe tell about the plot of the book, I feel almost ashame​d of it as if it is a wrong book to read. Anyway g​reat discussion post and nice to know I am not the only one feeling this way.

    Like

  22. Fanna says:

    Hahaha, I loved this post! Yes, sometimes it’s the most dreaded questions and while it open up the possibilities to meet my next bookworm best friend, it carries too much risk 😀

    Like

  23. Katie Wilkins (@DoingDewey) says:

    I feel like an awful lot of what I read can either be viewed as snobby (literary fiction or nonfiction) or fluff (YA, fantasy, romance). Sometimes when asked this question I’ll cheat and list the last few books I’ve read to convey that I read pretty diversely 🙂

    Like

  24. Beth Syler says:

    I think at one time I felt that shame for reading books that I thought were not either ‘intellectually stimulating’ or ‘literary masterpieces’ and I forced myself to read books that I didn’t really enjoy but I think I’ve got to the point in my life that reading is for the sheer enjoyment of myself and not so I can appear clever or thoughtful. I think the most freeing thought I’ve ever had is that some classic book aren’t always good books and that opened up a new world for me. Now I read whatever makes me happy.

    Like

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