Classic Remarks: Recommend a Holiday Classic

Classic Remarks 1

Classic Remarks is a meme hosted here at Pages Unbound that poses questions each Friday about classic literature and asks participants to engage in ongoing discussions surrounding not only themes in the novels but also questions about canon formation, the “timelessness” of literature, and modes of interpretation.  Feel free to comment even if you are not officially participating!  This week’s prompt is:

Recommend a classic you think should be read during the holiday season.

I don’t normally read seasonally, so when I first thought about this prompt, all I could come up with was the perennial favorite A Christmas Carol–but I’ve never enjoyed the film versions and the actual story fell flat for me when I finally read it, since I’d seen so many film versions.  Fortunately, however, J. R. R. Tolkien is here to rescue us from any holiday reading slumps.

The Father Christmas Letters collects letters that Tolkien wrote and illustrated for his children between 1920 and 1942.  Supposedly from Father Christmas himself, they tell the adventures of the titular character as well as of the North Polar Bear, who often gets into mischief.  Fans of Tolkien are sure to appreciate this offering!

Leave your link below! Krysta 64

8 thoughts on “Classic Remarks: Recommend a Holiday Classic

  1. Books, Vertigo and Tea says:

    I admit I have never read A Christmas Carol.. ashamed of that fact. But I just downloaded it and may start there. I am not big on holiday reads. I may have to look into The Father Christmas Letters as well 😊

    Like

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