Why I Don’t Collect Books

 

why-i-do-not-collect-books-min

In the book blogosphere, collecting books seems to be a badge of honor.  The more volumes you own and the less floor space you have to put them on, the greater your bookworm cred.  “Bookish problems: running out of room for your all your books!” is the cute little way of saying that maybe you have a problem.  However, suggesting that owning more stuff somehow gives a person increased credibility as an avowed lover of stories or a critic of literature ignores all the very good reasons an individual might not have for collecting copies of books.

My own reasons for being particular about what I buy and what I keep no doubt mirror the concerns of many.  So below I explain exactly why collecting books in your room until you can’t find your bed may not always be ideal.

The Money

Let’s face it.  Not everyone has the means to buy every latest hardcover upon release.  When a person has bills to pay, rent to make, children to care for, etc. books aren’t going to be a top priority.  And while it sounds cute and quirky to say “Who needs food?  I buy books!” this isn’t how life works and it dismisses the concerns many people have about finding ways to enjoy their favorite pastimes when they really are trying to find a way to put dinner on the table that week.

I personally buy very few books because I simply can’t afford it–and I don’t mean that in a “I can’t afford it because I spent my money on video games or a new dress this week” way.  Instead I show support for authors by checking their books out of the library (encouraging libraries to buy more of this author’s work and in turn inspiring other patrons to buy a book they borrowed and enjoyed) and by promoting their work through the blog.

The Logistics

Owning enough books to start up your own library sounds like a great idea–until you have to move.  If you’re moving out of your parents’ house, you’ll have to bring a second truck just to transport them, or maybe pay hundreds of dollars to have them shipped (and hope the post office actually delivers them all). Then you have to lug them all up the stairs only to find that your tiny new apartment actually needs to have stuff like furniture in it and you no longer have space for your hundreds of books.

Like many young people in America, you will probably change apartments frequently as you seek out lower rent or a better job and then you will have to repeat the hassle of lugging books around every few years.  Your friends will soon get tired of helping you move and will find ways to be “busy” that weekend, so then you’ll be stuck lugging your hundreds of books up the stairs alone.

It’s simply easier to cull books from your shelves before you have to move and you find yourself weeping over having to part with dozens of them at once because you can’t transport them and you don’t have the space to store them.

The Desire to Pass It On

When you own hundreds of books, it becomes increasingly unlikely that you’re going to reread them all at some point.  I take a hard look at my books and assess how likely I am ever to pick each one up again.  If I only liked a story a little bit, I remove it from my collection and donate it to the library or to an organization that provide books to children who don’t have any.  I see no reason for me to hoard dozens of books I won’t read when others don’t have access to books at all.  Besides, if I ever do want to read the book again, there’s always the library.

Krysta 64

69 thoughts on “Why I Don’t Collect Books

  1. Briana says:

    I like having books, but there is a point where I think it’s possible to have too many. If you’re looking at a 550 square foot apartment, which you need to put actual furniture in besides bookcases, you have to be realistic. You also have to be realistic about moving those books when you change living situations. I still acquire books from used books sales and such, but I gave hundreds away the first time I moved. I’d rather save the space and give them to someone who likes them. There’s no point in hoarding books you didn’t even like, will never read again, and wouldn’t bother recommending to your friends just so you can impress visitors with the sheer number of books in your home.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Emily | RoseRead says:

    Great points! Such control! Lol, I am a heavy book buyer, and at times feel quite guilty about it. I buy books way faster than I read them, and don’t know if I ever will at times! But the reason I do that is because I love being surrounded by the possibility they offer. It’s like having a mini library or bookstore in my home to explore – I’m surrounded by possibility. (And also by LOTS of boxes…I am currently of that age you mentioned where I’m moving a lot, so much of my collection is currently boxed up. But one day I hope to settle in and have a proper place). I even have a quote on one of my shelves that says “Owning a lot of books is not about reading them, but about the possibility of reading them.” It’s totally irrational, but totally how I feel, lol!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      Oh, I know how you feel! Sometimes I look around at all my books and think “I don’t feel like reading any of these.” I need more options! Even so, I’ve had to be realistic and give many of my books away. But I’ll end up buying six books at the next library book sale anyway, so it’s not like I’m ever likely to be book deprived no matter how much self control I attempt to have!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. KliScruggs says:

    I LOVE you addressed this. I feel like you brought up so many valid points. I try to only buy books I would want to read again, or books I want my children to read. So I definitely respect you writing this post. I’m all for it and its practicality. It seriously means so much you published it. I know it can be an unpopular opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      I think many of us are the position of not having the money, the space, or just the desire to buy hundreds of books, but it can be awkward saying you don’t have what so many others take for granted. But I think we should be having a conversation about the ways in which we sometimes try to assume some sort of superiority over others if we happen to have more opportunities or wealth than others.

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  4. The Heart and the Page says:

    Great post! I only buy a book after I’ve reread the libraries copy a least twice. Nothing worse than spending money on a book only to find out its awful. It’s definitely hard sometimes seeing everyone with their brand new hardcovers, but my bank account definitely appreciates my self control. Bookoutlet.com often has some super cheap scratch/dent books too!

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  5. ravenandbeez says:

    This is such a great post! I’ve been thinking about addressing this situation on my blog for a while now. While I’m not in America OR working, I’m just a student and most of my pocket money is used up in transport and if I save up money I tend to use it for my vet bills. Which means that at the end of the day I don’t have a lot of money for books. Recently I’ve stopped purchasing new books and started sticking to buying books from an old library run by volunteers. At least they use the money to increase their collection which helps us all.

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    • Krysta says:

      When I buy books now it’s almost always from something like a library book sale. I feel good because I’m supporting the library and, if I don’t like the book, I only spent $1 on it so I can donate it back to the library for the next sale and not feel awful about it!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Megan @ bookslayerReads says:

    This is such a great post! It was like I was reading my own words and thoughts lol. I feel the same as you do. There’s absolutely NOTHING wrong with ebooks (my preference) and libraries. Tweeting this post right now! 😀

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    • Briana says:

      Ebooks are great! I’ve been somewhat reluctant about them even though I own a Kindle because I do really like having books in my home and being able to look at them on the shelf. But space is a finite thing, so I’ve been becoming more open to buying more ebooks. My Kindle has also been really useful for travelling when I’m worried about weight limits for carry-on luggage and whatnot, so that’s a plus.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Megan @ bookslayerReads says:

        I have room for one bookshelf (total of 5 shelves in it) and it’s almost full. So ebooks are a good way to go for me. And they’re way cheaper. Also like you said about traveling… all my ebooks are on my iPad and my iPhone, so I have all of my ebooks with me at all times and don’t have to worry about breaking my back with a pack full of books! I try to save buying books for the books I really, really love or books I have signed copies of. I have seen some really neat bookshelves that I do admire, though! Lol.

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        • Briana says:

          If I were wealthier and had a larger home, I can’t say I wouldn’t pile bookcases all over it. :p But that’s probably years off in my future, so in the meantime I have to be more practical. I just moved and was able to buy another bookcase because the apartment is bigger than my old one, but it’s highly likely I’ll be moving again in a year and maybe the next apartment will be smaller, so I’m trying not to go too crazy with the books. I also like to buy ones I know I’ll love and will want to reread or maybe loan to others.

          Liked by 1 person

  7. Risa says:

    Agreed! I only have books on my shelf that I love re-reading. They’re only about 40 books. But that’s enough. Since I enjoy reading classics I figure a kindle is enough. I also read a lot on my kindle. Saves space and money. Reading really isn’t my life; it’s a pleasurable hobby. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      Yes, classics are nice because you can often get them free online and libraries tend to stock them! If I read a classic and think I’ll reread it I might buy it, but otherwise the library is the place for me.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. luvtoread says:

    I have a lot of books, an embarrassingly high number, and the majority are books that I haven’t read yet. I’m pretty good about not saving books that I’ve read that I know I won’t reread, and those I either donate, take to a used bookstore, or use paperbackswap.com for swapping used books.
    Now, even though I have such a huge number of books lying around, only a few of them are brand-new purchases and those I reserve for authors I love, or for a book club selection that I think I’ll really love.
    I get most of my books either from swapping, or from library book sales, or garage sales.
    I also swap books with friends and family, I even loan out books that I haven’t read yet if I hear someone say they want to read a book and I’ve got it. And even though I have so many books at home unread, I still check books out from the library a lot.
    There’s just something about knowing that those books are there that is calming to me. Kind of like that no matter what happens, I’ll still have all of those books to keep me occupied.
    Every so often I’ll go through and donate books that I know I won’t read, I probably need to do that again soon!
    Great post! I am always so interested to hear about people’s book habits. We are all so very different and it’s wonderful!
    And totally agree about moving books – that is a pain in the neck!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      I have a lot of books, too, and part of that is because I often need to reference them and I can’t always be running off to the library or because they’re more specialized books and the library doesn’t even carry them (and I can’t wait a month for an ILL to come in). But if I do buy a book and I never read it and it’s been on my shelf for years, I donate it. I buy enough books from used book sales that it’s not likely I’ll ever run out of books and I need to be careful about what I do with my limited space.

      Liked by 1 person

      • luvtoread says:

        Yeah, it’s just easier if a book is already on our shelves when we need to reference it!
        I really need to go through my bookshelves and donate those I know I won’t ever get to.
        Thanks for the inspiration!

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Hilary @ SongsWroteMyStory says:

    Wonderfully put! I sort of collect books, in the sense that I buy when I can, but I also make use of the library and sharing books amongst my friends. I can’t afford a ton of books right now, and I’m coming up to my 8th move in 6 years. Collecting hundreds of books just isn’t an option. Maybe someday but it won’t be any time soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Kristen @ Metaphors and Moonlight says:

    It’s kind of… frustrating? This idea that you’re not a true bookworm unless you have 7000 books. Like, all those bookish problems and “you know you’re a bookworm when” posts leave me feeling rather meh or like an outsider because half the things on the lists are about owning too many physical books, and I don’t have that problem. But I’m not any less of a book lover because of that. Like you, I just can’t afford them. I’ve only bought a few physical books in the past few years, and they were ones I had already read and knew that I loved and knew would be worth the money. Plus, as nice as it would be to have more physical books, I actually prefer reading ebooks. I like being able to take them everywhere, to highlight quotes, to know I can’t accidentally lose or ruin them, etc.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Krysta says:

      Yes, I have a problem with the assumption that to be a true book lover you need to be a wealthy book lover. That assumption excludes a lot of people and there’s really no reason why owning more physical books than another person makes you better than they are.

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  11. Kourtni @ Kourtni Reads says:

    Great post! I’ve definitely noticed in the book community that if you don’t own hundreds of books, you’re kind of looked down upon as if you can’t possibly be a “real bookworm” without spending half your paycheck on books. There are so many reasons why people may not want to have tons and tons of books and it doesn’t make you any less of a reader than those who do. I feel like just about anything a reader does can get them branded as less of a bookworm. It’s so tiring lol

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    • Krysta says:

      Right? It’s almost like people are expecting me to go into debt to prove my love of books. Like they really think I ought to buy a few books instead of my groceries for the week! But, really, I think the kind of people who assume you need to own hundreds of books to be a “real” book lover just aren’t thinking about what they’re saying and are forgetting that others aren’t as fortunate as they are to have the money and the space to do that.

      Liked by 1 person

        • Briana says:

          I definitely bought more books as a teenager. Even in college. It’s true you have less money as a teen because you’re either relying on your parents for money or only have a part-time job, but you also tend to have fewer expenses, so it’s easier to spend what money you have on fun things. At least in my experience.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Kourtni @ Kourtni Reads says:

            That was (and still is) my experience as well. The only thing I had to pay for as a teenager was my phone bill. I didn’t and still don’t have my license so I didn’t have to worry about car payments or insurance or gas or anything like that. But I was still working around 15 hours a week so I could spend that money however I wanted. Even now I’m in college and obviously have tuition and everything to pay for, but I live on-campus and don’t have to worry about paying rent or utilities or anything like that. So I can still sometimes afford to splurge on books a bit. But I know that once I move out and am on my own, I’m going to have very little money to spend how I want. Suggesting that people should ignore their needs to buy books is ridiculous.

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  12. Nandini Bharadwaj says:

    I totally agree with you! All the books that I own fits inside one shelf and that’s about it. I usually give them away too or I just don’t buy them. These days I’m turning to eBooks because libraries in my area don’t stack the kind of books I like to read. Also, my mom is a neat freak, so I don’t think she’d appreciate having to dust a book collection often.
    The money part is something I can definitely relate to. In my country, English books are really expensive when they’re written by foreign authors, so I rarely go out to a bookstore these days.

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  13. georgiedawn says:

    I think it’s great if you somehow have enough money and space for hundreds of books, but who actually does? I’m 18 with a part time job – realistically, I should be saving my money. If I can get it at a library or download it for free, it helps me so much! I also found out recently that you can buy ex-library books on Amazon for as little as 50p, which is great!

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    • Krysta says:

      Yes, we all have different life circumstances so it makes no sense to create a bookworm hierarchy where those with more money and space are the “real” bookworms. I’d frankly rather be responsible with my money and pay my bills and save something for the future–not make myself broke and try to act cute about it like “Oh, but you know bookworms! Books come before emergency funds!” Especially when there is the library and used book sales and I don’t even need to be going broke over books.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Geraldine @ Corralling Books says:

    Absolutely love that you talked about this, Krysta! I know I was that person who couldn’t have many books when I was younger, because I didn’t earn the money for it, and my parents were reluctant to buy me books when we had a perfectly good library near by. Although it’s good getting books, and showing off your book hauls, it’s also important to keep the important things in life in mind 🙂 Great discussion post! ❤

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    • Krysta says:

      Book hauls can be fun but sometimes they come across as “Look what I got that you didn’t.” I think we need to be careful about how we’re discussing our books and our collections, and not create a hierarchy where owning more books makes you a “better” bookworm or spending more than you can afford on books becomes a badge of honor.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. DaniellaWrites says:

    I used to have an insane amount of books – relics from cheap jumble sales, and teenage purchases funded by working at the grocery store. When I became an adult I very quickly learned how much of a pain it is to move more than 30 boxes of books (with half my stock still in storage with my parents, no less!)

    As someone who now has a low income, I’ve pared down my collection considerably. I’ve kept only favourites and a few books to read that I’m positive I’ll enjoy. I live a few blocks from the library, and as I’m in a large city their catalogue is extensive. I make far more use of their services now than I ever did as a teen.

    While I don’t deny that it would be lovey to live somewhere with floor to ceiling shelves and a sliding ladder, that isn’t in the cards for me at the moment and I’m happy with what I have now.

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    • Krysta says:

      Yes, the dream is to have a library like the Beast’s in Beauty and the Beast! But while I wait for that moment, I am content with having fewer books and being able to see my floor. 🙂 And the library is always available! I use ILL a lot and they charge, but 50 cents for a book is better than $25.

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  16. Donna says:

    I don’t like the idea that a real book lover should possess overflowing bookcases. Not everyone wants them or can afford them. When I started blogging in January, I mainly reviewed library books, but then I got sick again and was unable to leave the house. Fortunately, I have a husband who can afford to offer me a few books a month and thanks to the Amazon kindle deals, I manage to get food for my brain. As a student, I can’t spend all my money on books. Still, I admit I enjoy keeping a little bookcase and watching the shelves slowly grow. I moved 6 times in 8 years, so my arms are strong enough for book boxes! 🙂

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    • Krysta says:

      I mostly review library books. When I do buy books it’s typically from a library book sale. And guess what? I never run out of books! I find I don’t need to keep buying them and going into debt just to be able to read!

      Haha, but yes! Carrying books around counts as exercise! At least, that’s what I tell myself!

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  17. Lost In A Good Book says:

    I used to love collecting books. This was my pre-kindle days. Then I suddenly became foster mom to three kids. Things had to change very quickly. I pulled the books off my shelves. I remember they filled 3 large garbage bags. (minus the few I decided I couldn’t live without, still about 3 shelves worth) and they all got donated. Shortly afterward, when I could catch my breath, I bought a kindle and now my entire collection travels with me and I have room for kid/teenager stuff in my house. I’m no less a bookworm because I don’t have physical copies. But then anyone who thinks that is the only marker of a true fan of books is too narrowminded for me to care much about their opinion.

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    • Krysta says:

      Yes, adding more people to your house will certainly cut down on your space! But we’re lucky to be living in the time of ebooks. It’s so convenient to be able to have the books without having to find the space for them!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. kirstyandthecatread says:

    I’ve taken a hard look at my own buying habits the past few months. I’ve tried to do a book buying ban this month and I’ve wrapped be books I own to get excited again for all the books I’ve had for about a year. I Also don’t tend to re-read books as much as I used to before I started blogging so I definately need to make some changes.

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    • Krysta says:

      Finding time to reread can definitely be challenging when so many good books are being published all the time! But I think I do have a good sense of what I might reread–even if that means five years from now–so I’ve been able to cull my bookshelves significantly.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. otakutwins1 says:

    I don’t think people are serious when they say they’d rather buy books than food (I hope, at least) I think they’re just saying that they enjoy buying books and supporting authors that way. I tend to get a lot of my books from the library because I don’t have a job and don’t have a lot of money. But I would love to buy books I love so I can have them and build a huge bookshelf to go along with it. I don’t think there’s a problem with that at all 🙂

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    • Krysta says:

      Saying you’d rather buy books than food is sort of a cute way to suggest that you’re spending money you don’t have (or that you should be spending on something else/saving). People might not literally be starving themselves for books, but the saying is suggesting that there’s a spending problem somewhere and it’s playing into this idea that collecting books you can’t afford is a badge of honor in the book world and that the more books you have, the more of a “real” bookworm you are.

      I’m not saying that buying books is a problem. I own many books and I love them. I’m pointing out that there is a reason many people don’t have the wall-to-wall stacks of books that others have and it’s not because they’re not as serious about literature as the people who can afford to buy more books.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Elle @ Perusing Pages says:

    I have a lot of books, definitely not as many as some people, but like one of the other commenters said, I like the possibilities… plus they’re just pretty. =) On that note though, unlike a lot of bloggers, I don’t shop at B&N or Target for books often. I completely agree with you on being able to pay for other things and not being able to afford it. I like traveling too so saving money for that is a big deal for me. I either buy used from a lot of thrift stores or clereance sections or from BookOutlet.com (and I haven’t bought anything from them in about 7 months). Other than slightly losing my sanity when I went to YALC this year, I’ve been on a book buying ban. I only buy new, full priced books if it’s something I’ve been highly anticipating. I made a similar post like this on Instagram about people spending too much money on books (seriously, 4 books at B&N is like $100) and I got so much crap for it.

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    • Briana says:

      Wow, people were really that mad about you not buying books??? I like having books myself, and I’m definitely a fan of supporting authors, but I do think there’s room for recognition in the book community that people come from different backgrounds. I know some people have felt unwelcome and unable to succeed on Booktube and Bookstagram because they can’t afford a lot of shiny new releases. And that’s sad. I *do* have an reasonable number of books myself, but they’be been collected over a number of years, and I’ve been trying to be better about giving away the ones I’ve read and didn’t even like that much. There’s no point in hoarding books I didn’t enjoy and won’t read again, just so I can say I own them.

      And I totally agree with used book sales and the Book Outlet! I do buy new releases I am highly anticipating and know I want in my collected, but $20 for one book is no joke. Buying six new releases at once is not in the cards for me at this point in my life. (Not saying I won’t be buying all the books with the best of them if I have a better-paying job in the future…)

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      • Elle @ Perusing Pages says:

        They weren’t mad at me for not buying books, but more that I criticized how much it costs to buy new books. If you can afford it and that’s the choice you make, that is fine. Everyone has their vices! But for me personally, I don’t think I would ever spend hundreds per month on books even if I were Oprah rich when there are so many other options to read them. I don’t want this to come out the wrong way–I love books, they’re incredible, and I wish everyone in the world could have a huge library of books–but books have no resale value once they are out of the store. Even when you take them to used bookstores to sell, you get like $5 for 50 books. I recently discovered the Books for Trade community, and that’s the closest I’ve seen to being able to reuse books without just giving them away. As everyone has pointed out, you may not even like a book or never reread that you’ve just spent $20 on. That’s $20 that could have went toward a trip or a concert ticket. I’m a big believer in having experiences vs. material things (though I do love those too). That was the gist of my post, which I understand may come off being judgemental the opposite way, but it really is something I just don’t understand.

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        • Briana says:

          That makes sense! Generally I defend the price of books because it takes a lot of labor from a lot of people to print a book, and the reality is that most authors do not make particularly impressive amounts of money from it. So, sure, I understand why a book or an ebook is $20. But I also completely agree with you that reading is a fairly expensive hobby if you buy a lot of books. If you read 100 books a year and only pay $10 each, you’re looking at $1000. And that does seem like a lot if you’re not really into rereading the books you own and are just watching them collect dust after you finish them. $1000 is halfway to getting me a decent vacation in another country if I plan right!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Krysta says:

      I am sometimes astounded at the money people spend on books–they’re clearly spending hundreds of dollars a month–but if they have that ability, good to them. I just wish people wouldn’t act like you HAVE to have more books than you afford or store in order to be a “real” bookworm. I have many books (most of which I get from used book sales), but I also have to be realistic about my space and often when I buy new books I have to let other books go.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Greg Hill says:

    I sort of collect books but generally only books I REALLY want because they’re favorites or whatever. I’m not one of the bloggers who has books overflowing everywhere. 🙂 My kindle on the other hand is getting full, cause quite frankly it’s cheaper (sometimes?) yo buy books that way. I used to buy everything hardcover or paperback but not anymore.

    I used to collect books more, pre- blogging- I would snatch up SF paperbacks at used bookstores (I can’t wait to read this- then it sat never read) and when I moved I had boxes of books to lug. So yeah- got ya there.

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    • Krysta says:

      Yeah, I actually own a lot of books that I’ve collected over the years (usually from used book sales), but when I moved I donated lot of them. I just don’t have anywhere to put them now and hauling the ones I have was enough of a pain. Sometimes I buy books and never read them. Eventually I recognize that I’m not going to read them so I just donate them. I figure I’ll go to the library if I realize five years from now I really wanted to read that story, after all.

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  22. rantandraveaboutbooks says:

    Moving! You hit the nail on the head for me. Instead of moving out of my parents house, I’m moving back into it temporarily, and I have an entire shipping container of stuff. 4 giant containers are full of books, and that’s after I donated a bunch. I stopped buying paper books two years ago and switched to Kindle, but now I’ve started buying paper copies again, and it’s not only costly but a real pain to find space for all of them. I think some bloggers think collecting books makes them legit, but I don’t see it that way. I like free books when I can get them. And the library is a great place to find them. 🙂

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    • Krysta says:

      That’s the other thing about books. Giving them away doesn’t actually mean you’ll have fewer books, because you’ll find yourself buying more anyway! I try to keep some sort of equilibrium where, when I bring stuff in, I also take stuff out. But it’s not easy!

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Allison @ The Book Wheel says:

    I’m with you! When we moved across the country, I purged more than half of my books. Aside from the initial anxiety, it felt great and I was able to pass on a lot of good ones. I’m moving again next week and have already purged a lot of the books I’ve amassed since the last move only this time I’m not anxious about it. I tend to read most of my books on an e-reader, anyway, so if I buy a book it’s typically to get it signed, which means it’s an author I love (I don’t venture into downtown Denver unless I *really* like the author). That said, I do have a #30Authors shelf but for me that’s a personal favorite.

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    • Krysta says:

      Yes, giving away books doesn’t actually leave most of us without any books–because we can’t help but buy new ones to replace them! 😀 Ebooks are really handy for saving on space, though.

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  24. Michelle @ Pink Polka Dot Books says:

    Love this topic!! I don’t collect books either. I’m constantly donating books to a library who gives underprivileged teens books to keep. I think it’s cool that other people collect all the editions of books and stuff, but it also gets annoying sometimes. Like Books for Trade seems like it’s all “collectors” and I’m over here like– I just want to trade for a book I haven’t read yet. I will say though, the more I get into Bookstagram, the more books I’ve been keeping around 😦 AND I would spend every last dollar I had on books if I could, I just wouldn’t keep them all…. why do I want a copy of a book that I thought was just okay??

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    • Krysta says:

      Yes, if I had the money I’d be buying a lot more books! But I don’t know if I’d keep them. If I didn’t like the book, I don’t see the point of hanging on to it when I can pass it along to someone who might actually enjoy it.

      Like

  25. Chrystal says:

    I have quite a few books, most read but some unread. My new goal is as I read them, if I do not think I’d read it again I let it leave my house.I either give to family\friends, leave in a Little Free Library, donate or sell.

    I’ve learned that I don’t need to keep every book I buy or am given. And I’ll be using the library a lot more in 2017. You know, once I’ve read the ones on my shelves. 🙂

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      That’s how I try to think. If I read a book and think “Eh, it was okay,” I try to donate it immediately before I can become attached.

      Like

  26. TeacherofYA says:

    That’s why I believe so fervently in the power of ebooks. I get them on sale and then I have a library that I can carry with me! I know there’s nothing like the feel of a good book, but I already have enough, and I can’t really spare any room since I’m living in a bedroom and not a house. So I feel you! And I think it’s great that you shared this with us. 👏👏👏

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      Yes and ereaders are great for travelling! Trying to find a way to carry something like The Count of Monte Cristo around can be difficult ;b

      Like

  27. DoingDewey says:

    I only collect a handful of my very favorite books and signed books. I don’t collect first editions or all that many books for all the reasons you mentioned 🙂

    Like

    • Krysta says:

      I really don’t care that much about first editions and such. I think it’s kind of cool when I get to see one, but I don’t think I need to spend money to own one myself.

      Like

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