Blogger Stats Survey Results

Book Blogger StatsIntroduction

After numerous bloggers expressed interest in seeing what the “average” book blog stats might look like, I decided to conduct an informal survey and share the results.  While there are things about the survey I would change if I could do it again, I hope everyone finds the results useful.  That said, if anyone else wants to do a follow-up survey with different questions, I’d be interested in seeing that, too.

Altogether, 67 book bloggers answered the survey.


Survey Results

Most of the bloggers who answered are fairly new bloggers, with about 72% reporting they have been blogging two years or less.  However, I’ll try to note where I can throughout the survey whether the age of the blog seems correlated to the stats.

Blog Stats 1

It appears that 0-100 views per days is normal. Seventy-five percent of bloggers said they receive 75 or fewer views per day. About the same percentage of bloggers said they have 500 or fewer followers.

Blog Stats 2

One blogger reported getting over 600 views per day and one reported over 1000 views per day. Clearly these two bloggers are outliers.  Both of these bloggers have been blogging about four years.  However, age of the blog is not always a factor. For instance, some bloggers who have been blogging six months reported higher page views than a blogger who has been active for three years.  A few bloggers who have been active five years or more reported 50-75 views per day.

Note that for the purposes of the survey, I let bloggers define “blog followers” themselves, so there was no standard of whether, for instance, Twitter followers should be counted as blog followers.  However, there is some correlation between followers and views. The blogger with 1000+ views per day reported between 5,000 and 10,000 followers, most of them blog-specific followers and not from social media

Despite the fact that most bloggers are looking at 0-100 views per day and 0-500 followers, most bloggers thought their stats were low and assumed everyone else was doing better. So the main take-away here is probably that we’re all doing just fine.

Blog Stats 3

The second take-away seems to be that breaking the 100+ views barrier is hard, and maybe that’s what we should consider “unusually successful” for a book blogger.  However, only about 12% of respondents thought 100-150 views would be successful, with the largest percentage (26%) expecting 1000-3000 views per day.  The votes for blog followers were pretty divided, but four people thought a successful book blogger will have over 10,000 followers–which seems very hard to achieve.

Blog Stats 4

Interestingly, the person with 1000+ views per day correctly predicted their views were higher than the average blogger’s, but also suggested a “successful” blogger has 1000+ views per day. I guess that makes them the only successful person here. :p (If this was your answer, I’m not picking on you! I just think it’s amusing!)

Finally, most bloggers say they have more followers on social media, than followers who are specifically following their blog using services like email sign-ups or Bloglovin’.

Blog Stats 5

Does “Successful” Mean High Stats?

Of course, one of the major drawbacks of the survey is that it seems to assume a conflation of “successful” and “big.” If I redid the survey, I’d like to clarify terms to ensure we’re all talking about the same thing. However, I did collect some open feedback on whether the respondents thought there was a difference between “successful” bloggers and “big” bloggers. There were a lot of answers, so this is just a sampling:

(About seven people just said some version of “No” or “Not really,” so while there’s not much to quote here, I do want to recognize the people who said “successful” and “big” are basically the same. A few also said they weren’t sure or hadn’t really thought about the question before.)

“A big book blogger is someone people follow because everyone knows who they are, so their number of followers is way above average — doesn’t necessarily mean a substantial percentage of followers read the posts though. A successful book blogger still has an above average following but that comes with a sizeable amount of interaction from them via comments, shares on social media or link-ups on many other blogs. A successful blogger also has high visibility among publishers, authors, etc. as well as readers who aren’t involved in the book blogosphere beyond reading those successful blogs.”

“Yes, successful book bloggers interact with their readers, earn money and have readers that come back again and again. Big book bloggers don’t necessarily interact with their readers, they write to put their content out there, not to share and discuss their opinion.”

“I think a successful book blogger is someone who is happy and content with their blogs and social interactions, and in that case I do consider myself a successful blogger. A ‘Big” book blogger is someone who, in my opinion, is good at running their blog like a job- which is what I think it takes to have a large following and influence. Can the two overlap? Absolutely! For some bloggers, their idea of success *is* being a big name blogger.”

“Definitely! Even though I answered the other poll questions about stats of a successful blogger, I think a ‘successful’ blogger is more individualistic and a label that varies in definition for each blogger. In my case, I think a ‘successful’ blogger is one that interacts with their readers regularly and consistently. As for ‘big’ blogger, I think of that to be someone with a great following and/or higher blog statistics.”

“I think you can be successful w/o being big if you still have a lot of people who interact on your posts and if you are involved in the book community.”

“I think being monetized is a big part of it, primarily because it costs money to run a blog. I kind of think of successful book bloggers as the ones that have also some kind of industry background, and are in on a lot of bookish news that a lot of book bloggers may not be.”

“A big book blogger doesn’t necessarily mean they are interacting with followers and fellow bloggers. A successful book blogger is someone who interacts with the blogging community regularly, enjoys what they do, reads what they can and has fun.”

“I think it’s possible to be a ‘big’ book blogger (have many followers) but not be successful in producing unique, quality content.”

And, perhaps my favorite:

“I view “successful” as a blog who has some sort of following other than their close family and friends. I view a “big” blog as one that everyone knows about.”

I would agree that if you’re writing content that’s interesting enough that someone who isn’t forced to read it for their love of you is reading it, then you’re successful at blogging! You have a real audience!

Thank you to everyone who participated! Let me know what you think about the results in the comments!

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60 thoughts on “Blogger Stats Survey Results

  1. Joey @ thoughts and afterthoughts says:

    I don’t remember if I participated in this survey or not! Damn.

    But the results are interesting and enlightening!

    Was there a standard definition used for “book blogger”? I’m just curious because I would still class creators on BookTube under “Blogger” but that’s just my own preference. I ask this because the range to which “success” is often associated might differ per medium; where Bookstagram can see 10k+ followers as success, BookTube far reaching into the 20k+, and “bloggers” skyward of 3k+ (seems to be a standard benchmark). I’m definitely just throwing rough numbers out there though.

    But in terms of validating the “blogger” number, it’s difficult to consider the follower count because there’s a high chance that the number is inflated due to double+ dipping across all social media platforms. And, like many of the feedback stated, it can be often difficult to correlate high follower count to active blog retention and engagement. I mean…yeah it makes things easier, but there’s no certainty that people who follow you on social will gratuitously drop by your blog unless you mention it to them on that platform.

    It’s a bit of a misnomer [to me] that “presence/visibility”–and therefore blogging ‘success’–is lumped into one all defining value; especially when there are socially savvy individuals who excel at Twitter, for example, but see limited engagement in their actual blog. I’m not suggesting this is the case for everyone but it’s undeniably a phenomena for some.

    “…don’t necessarily interact with their readers, they write to put their content out there, not to share and discuss their opinion.”
    — this comment is what I fear the most. When I first started this adventure in blogging, it was definitely manageable (and easy) to drop comments. But as you follow more people and seeing skyward of 100+ posts a day on your feed, it becomes such a tedious thing to comment on every single post; not to mention the delays in responding back to comments. It sucks, and I’ve personally had to un-follow some who’s interests diverged than what it was initially (though still book related).

    Sorry for my essay of a response haha.

    Cheers,
    Joey

    Like

    • Briana says:

      Great questions!

      I didn’t define “book blogger” for the purposes of the survey in the sense of telling people whether or not they could participate. However, I was assuming people who have a written blog, not people who are pretty much only on Booktube or Instagram. I think the people who follow me are primarily book bloggers, and those are the people who answered, and I think the results generally support that. I agree that the numbers for Booktube, for instance, are likely to be much higher than these.

      Right. For ease of answering I didn’t tell people what to count for follower numbers and kind of just let them do their thing. Part of that is actually because people tend to get hits from all kinds of different places. I have 600+ followers on Twitter, but they’re certainly not clicking through to my blog all the time. Most of my hits come from WordPress followers and Blogloin’. But I know some people say they get tons of traffic from Facebook or Twitter. So, while I would consider those people social media followers for me, they might be “real” blog followers for others.

      But you’re right about the double-counting. So the official WordPress count (which we have in our sidebar right now) counts, among other things, FB and Twitter followers, So, yeah, one person subscribed to both outlets would be counted as two followers. But, it doesn’t count things like Bloglovin’ followers. So it can all be kind of hard to parse out.

      I agree a more scientific survey would deal with all this, but I was more interested in getting a baseline for the numbers the “average” book blogger might be looking at.

      I also agree that following everything can be hard. I used to follow fewer bloggers more intensely. Now that I’m following a lot, it can seem like the interaction is more sporadic. I try at least to reply to all comments on my blog, but I might not be commenting all the time on all the blogs I follow.

      Like

  2. zoeyriver says:

    As someone who has been blogging for about 4 months, I’m so glad for this post. I started to get depressed, thinking: “is my blog any good?”. This is bound to cheer one up a bit (:

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I’m glad it helped! I’m thinking of doing a follow-up post just about our stats. They were very low for awhile when we first started. I think knowing that can be really useful to new bloggers because, as the survey shows, people tend to just assume everyone else’s stats are better than theirs!

      Like

  3. luvtoread says:

    These results are very interesting! I’m one of the newer bloggers, I’ll hit my one year mark next month, so I found these results fascinating. I thought my stats were very low in comparison to others (0-50 views a day, 101-300 followers), so I am very encouraged by these results. Thank you for this post.

    Like

    • Briana says:

      Our stats were hilariously low our first year of blogging because, well, we weren’t trying to get traffic. I wouldn’t say I *try* that hard now either, but I definitely wasn’t that involved in the community, wasn’t really on social media, etc. So definitely don’t feel alone!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Paula Vince says:

    Thanks very much for conducting this survey. It’s interesting, and heartening, to see that my blog falls within the biggest chunk of pie each time 🙂 I am not alone.

    Like

  5. La La in the Library says:

    Early last year I wasn’t getting approved for most of the low demand indie ARCs I was requesting, let alone any Big Five high profile ARCs, and I wasn’t getting picked to be on tours, so I had a heart to heart with a publicist from a small publishing house that I had requested an ARC from and had gotten turned down. She told me that their department looks for current views because blog followers can be what they call a “dead number”; in that the blog might have been popular once and have a large number of followers, but not currently getting a lot of views, or the blogger gained followers from a lot of giveaways and the followers aren’t regular viewers. She told me to put my view counter near the top of my blog if I had a sidebar and have it be the monthly total because if a publisher was looking at “all time” views it would mean nothing to them because they aren’t going to know how long you have been blogging. I had never thought of that before, that someone might gave tons of followers but not be getting big views. I consider sucess a large number of views because my blog is all about readers seeing the under the radar indie books I feature and the more people seeing them, the better. ‘)

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I don’t request many ARCs (and then it’s mostly on Netgalley), but I’ve heard similar things from other people, that recent page views are far more important than the number of followers. It completely makes sense to me that some people might have large numbers of followers who aren’t actively reading. I know just in give years that the people who were reading our blog in the beginning are, in some cases, no longer active in the blogging community and haven’t read our blog in a couple of years.

      Like

  6. saraletourneau says:

    A somewhat related question, but how did you embed your Google Form for the survey in your post? I’m trying to do the same for one of my upcoming posts, but I can’t seem to figure out how to do it.

    Like

    • Briana says:

      If you click the “send” button on the form, you can pick the two angle brackets option at the end, which will give you the HTML code you can post in the text editor. Frankly, I’m always slightly surprised this works because WordPress.com always seems so against any embedding, fancy HTML things. But it does!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Ellen @ Quest Reviews says:

    Fascinating! When I first started blogging, I had lots of aspirations. I guess I still do, but I’m more relaxed about them. My priorities have definitely changed. I put love of reading first, over everything else, and then comes community. I want to forge genuine friendships with people, where before, I was all about “followers.”

    Anyways, this post was good for some self-reflection and is greatly appreciated! 😀

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I think it makes sense to want followers. I mean, most of us are blogging because we want other people to read what we wrote and talk to us about it. But it also makes sense to prioritize reading because if you don’t love that, then what’s the point of blogging?

      Like

  8. Jamie Wu says:

    This was a great read! Really puts things into perspective. If I ever break the 100 views per day barrier, it would be such an awesome achievement that I would probably shout and scream for an entire day. 1000 in comparison feels like something impossible. I’m just happy that somebody is taking the time to read something I wrote. 😀

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I’m glad you found it helpful! I was kind of surprised myself that a large part of bloggers were falling in the numbers they were because I also kind of just assumed people had higher numbers. I can’t even imagine getting 1000 views a day or what that would look like. I know it’s possible for other blogs, but it seems really unusual for a book blog.

      Like

  9. Lunch-Time Librarian says:

    Thanks for putting this together! It’s so helpful. I think when I look at my own stats I often feel that they’re very low and that I’m the only person with stats like that. But this does put things into perspective. I’ve only been blogging for something like 9 months even though it feels like forever, so of course I won’t have the stats of people who have been more years. Its nice to feel that I have average stats haha

    For me a successful blogger is really defined by their interaction. Bloggers I see being mentioned often by other bloggers or getting lots of commenting engagement vs. just numbers. I know of bloggers with 1000+ twitter followers who don’t really get much comments on their actual posts. So they have the following, but not the engagement, and that, to me, is what creates success.

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I’m going to talk specifically about the Pages Unbound stats over 5 years on Saturday, and I think our first 8 months of stats were some of the most hilariously low things I’ve ever seen, so maybe that will make you feel better. :p

      I agree that interaction is really important, though! I think if I did another survey I would try to add questions that got at that. Interaction shows that people are actually reading your posts and find them interesting enough to actually leave a comment on them. That seems far more important to me than having high numbers or having people who kind of skim over your posts but ultimately decide they’re boring.

      I think there’s probably also some circular effect where, if you’re big, more people just follow you because they think you must be worth following if ALL THESE OTHER people are doing it. Or even possibly because there’s a hope said Big Blogger will one day mention you on Twitter or in a post and then you’ll get more visibility that way. But not all those followers may really care about what the Big Blogger is writing about. (Not that we all don’t have some “dead followers” who aren’t really reading our blogs.)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lunch-Time Librarian says:

        That does! haha. Exactly, better to have low stats and consistent commenting than high stats and no comments.

        Yesss, that’s so true. I definitely have a few people I follow because they have lots of followers but I’ve yet to comment on anything. And dead followers are definitely a thing. Especially if you hold a giveaway, you’re bound to get a few

        Like

  10. Lisa says:

    Really fascinating. Thanks so much for sharing your findings! I think it’s so interesting to see that most people feel like other blogs are more successful. That confirms a lot of casual comments I’ve read over the years, about how people always feel like others are doing better than they are. I guess it comes down to how you define success, as you point out. I was much more focused on numbers (and stressing about my lack of numbers) earlier on. I’ve settled much more into a groove, and feel happy with my interactions with interesting people, and that’s good enough for me! Honestly, I don’t know how the blogger with 1000 views per day can possibly keep up with comments! Sometimes I have a hard time even with a handful. 🙂

    Like

    • Briana says:

      Yes! I was seeing a lot of people saying they thought their stats were low, but if people did mention their stats (not often because apparently it’s a secret or something), they all seemed in the same area. So I’m glad the survey confirmed my theory we’re all pretty much in the same boat!

      I’m getting tired just thinking of how many comments a day that blogger must get. I think for those of us who value interaction, having too many invested followers might almost be a bad thing! 😛

      Like

    • Briana says:

      I’m glad you found it helpful!I I think it does confirm,at least, that most people aren’t secretly getting 500 views a day while the the rest of us are sobbing with 75. It seems people have similar stats (though of course there’s selection biased in the people who answered; I honestly don’t think a lot of “big” bloggers follow me or would have heard about the survey).

      Like

  11. Lianne @ eclectictales.com says:

    Thanks for sharing the results of this survey! It’s interesting to see how different bloggers perceive the difference between “big” bloggers and “successful” ones–can definitely be confusing as they can overlap! 🙂 Even after blogging for so long, I still can’t really differentiate between the two at times 😛

    Like

    • Briana says:

      Yes! I think the key is that we at least want enough followers to feel as if someone is actually reading what we write, and sometimes it may seem we need a lot of followers for that. But I think it’s also possible to feel successful if you have a handful of really dedicated readers.

      Like

  12. Fatima @ NoteablePad says:

    Thank you so much for putting this together and taking the time out of your day. It’s really fascinating! I think as bloggers, we do tend to compare ourselves, but stats like these are really helpful.
    For me, a successful blogger engages in discussions with other bloggers – and that doesn’t necessarily have to mean 1,000 + followers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Briana says:

      I agree! I think meaningful interactions are better than big numbers. It’s possible to have a lot of people nominally following you who aren’t reading your content or really interested in it. I think comments and conversations are more indicative that people think you’re saying something interesting, and of course forming relationships is better than talking into a void!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Denise says:

    This is so interesting – thank you for taking the time to put it together! I find it really interesting to see what other blogger’s see as big and successful, because I do feel inferior to other bloggers sometimes. According to some (and this survey), my blog stats would be successful, which is amazing to here! I think a successful blogger is someone who does what they love – stats don’t come into play

    Denise | The Bibliolater

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I definitely think that feeling happy with your blog and what you achieved is more important than numbers! As long as you’re having a good time blogging, that’s success!

      I was also surprised by the numbers because I kind of assumed that others’ stats were higher, as well. Of course there’s some selection bias in terms of people who answered–I’m sure there are many bloggers with higher numbers who just didn’t answer the survey–but I think it’s good to know everyone else isn’t getting 5000 views a day while I’m not. :p

      Like

  14. rantandraveaboutbooks says:

    Awesome post! You had such a good turn out for the survey. Definitely enough participants to get a real grasp on the data. Did you use Google to compute the stats or calcualate them in Excel? I’m just curious since I’m an analyst and use Excel all the time to compare financial stats. I’m such a dork. 🙈 But you already knew that. 😝 Haha! I think I said my stats were what I thought were normal. I noticed that since I started posting less my stats are lower than they were a month ago. But I’m okay with that. I’d rather have 10 people start a conversation about a book I reviewed than 30 people like my post or have 200 plus views. Yesterday was my 3 month blog anniversary. I think I’m doing pretty good for only 3 months in. I try to think of it as a slow progression. It takes time to build a following. I have about 20-30 bloggers I talk to all the time, and for me, that’s the best part of blogging. Between Twitter and WordPress, it’s a lot of fun. I can’t wait to see your post about your stats from 5 years ago. I really am a nerd because I’m thinking about it in terms of data collection over 5 years.

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I just used the pie charts that Google Forms puts together from the data.

      I probably could have done something with the data to get more specific stats on things like how much age of the blog influenced traffic, but I thought I had a decent amount of information to share already, so I just looked through the entries to see, for instance, if the people with the higher stats seemed in general to be older bloggers. (And, yeah, they’re not 6 months old, but they also weren’t the people saying they’ve been blogging 5+ years, so that was interesting.)

      I’ve seen people claim that you don’t need to post all the time to get stats, and you don’t–if we’re saying you don’t need to post literally every day. But I would argue most blogs with higher stats post at least a few times a week. I’ve definitely noticed our stats are higher when we post more frequently, partially because obviously people will read the new post of the day and partially because I think, the more content you have, the more likely you’re going to be getting search engine hits for it.

      But I also agree that having conversations is more interesting. For instance, I don’t really care about search engine hits even though they add to the numbers because those people never comment. And for all I know they come to my blog, think “Ugh, this wasn’t what I was looking for!” and immediately leave. So there’s not much to be excited about there. :p

      I almost feel weird about sharing our stats because it seems like such a secretive thing in the blogosphere. I don’t necessarily think it’s a faux pas, just that people (as the survey shows) generally assume other people’s stats are higher than theirs, and they don’t want to embarrass themselves?

      Liked by 1 person

      • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

        I think you have plenty of data from the Google form. I wasn’t sure if you had to do any additional analysis, but that’s nice it computed everything because queries for charts can be a pain. I honestly never look at where the numbers are coming from. I usually just see the total in the app. I haven’t been posting as much as I was back in April and the beginning of May. I noticed a huge drop in stats over the past month. A few bloggers I talk to also said the same thing. I thought that was interesting. I’m sure it has to do with activity during colder months vs summer months. What I found strange though was another blogger with the same amount of followers as me reported a few thousand page views in one day. There was no correlation to the number of followers on social media or their blog. If there’s less views or shares, I think some people assume it’s a representation of their writing or content. That probably leads to long breaks or quitting blogging all together. Even though my stats are lower this month, I’m still seeing a decent amount of interaction whether it’s a like, comment, or share on Twitter. If I’m seeing 50% or more positive feedback in some form, even if it’s lower than normal, I still consider than a good day. I started blogging to keep my mind fresh and to enhance my writing skills. For me, it serves its purpose either way. Lately, I find myself engaging with bloggers and readers more on Twitter. Yeah, I guess some people would feel embarrassed to share their stats. I should come up with a success formula where bloggers can enter their stats to see if they’re doing okay. That might help some people stay more active in the community if they could look solely at their own metrics instead of comparing themselves to others. I don’t even bother comparing myself to others. I do my own thing. And I haven’t been able to find anything in a more successful bloggers’ posts that I haven’t seen in other, with the exception of maybe a few blogs, yours included.

        Like

        • Briana says:

          We’ve had a dip in stats basically every single summer, so that may be what other people are seeing. I think you’re right that it has something to do with the warmer weather (since most of our readers are from the US), and I guess people aren’t online as much or something.

          It is interesting to think that low stats might contribute to people quitting blogging. That’s especially sad if what they’re thinking of as low stats aren’t necessarily as low as they believe.

          I do think there can be some luck involved in becoming a “big” blogger. Which is not to discount the work they do, because I also think anything with a massive following probably devotes hours of each day to their blog. But I’ve seen success stories from bloggers in different niches–food, fashion, whatever–and sometimes it seems it amounts to something like being in the right place at the right time, their blog just took off for no discernible reason because people like it, or whatever. You can definitely do things to grow your audience, but part of me wonders if it’s basically impossible to plan to get a massive following. It’s like when you ask people how they got into the career field you’re interested in and half of them are like “Well, some dude my parents’ college friend knows called me up one day and asked if I wanted a job, and I’d never thought about this industry before but I thought I would give it a shot, and here I am ten years later.” Like, part of me wants to believe in getting the right degree and interning and “a plan,” but at the end of the day, some people are just lucky.

          Liked by 1 person

          • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

            I agree with you on the luck part. I’ve read some of the big bloggers blogs and wasn’t all that impressed, but they have a lot of followers, some of which think they walk on water. I had a feeling summer was the reason for lower stats. It makes sense though. I’ve been so busy with my fiction writing and getting everything situated for these publishers that I haven’t written nearly as many posts as I’d like. It’s funny you mention luck, as far as a career field, because I’m one of those people. I was planning to go to law school before my dad’s friend hired me. I had zero desire to work in Naval aviation supply support. Well, who would? Lol.

            Like

            • Briana says:

              I was reading a food blog once, and the woman was posting about how she quit college to blog and how it had been a success story for her. And I was waiting for the part that was like “Do this and you can blog for a living, too!” and it was actually really that she’d started early in food blogging or something and had just been randomly offered tons of sponsorships. Her blog’s fine, but not the best I’ve seen. So stuff like that happens, I guess.

              I think pretty much everyone I talk to accidentally ended up in their career. Which, I’ll admit, makes sense for “more unusual” careers that maybe people don’t think of doing or existing. (I definitely haven’t thought of Naval aviation supply support as an existing job.) But I’ve encountered it a lot in publishing, too, where you get told to get the degree, do the internships, maybe do a publishing course, etc., and it’s kind of baffling that when so many people are trying so hard to get into it as an industry that half the people who ARE in it weren’t even trying. :p

              Liked by 1 person

            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              That’s interesting. She definitely lucked out as far as timing. I’ve only read book and writing blogs. Haha! Yeah, Naval aviation is a thing. It actually makes finding another job really easy because it’s so unique. I noticed a lot of lit agents do not have degrees in writing or related fields. I guess it’s like you said. They probably took an internship after college and sort of fell into it. That’s why I take their opinions with a grain of salt.

              Like

            • Briana says:

              One thing I’ve noticed about literary agents is they all have different opinions. :p I’m sure there’s some general consistency in terms of advice to be polite. But even things you’d think would be “static” are not. Someone I know, for instance, was rejected because the agent said she wouldn’t even look at a YA fantasy less than 100,000 words. Pretty sure every other agent in the world suggests 100,000 as the maximum for a YA book. (Also, the manuscript in question was not high fantasy and wouldn’t even need a higher word count to take into account world building and such).

              Like

            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              I can see that. I’ve read some articles about word counts and how it influences an agents’ decision to take on a new book. This week, after getting my 7th rejection, I decided to remove a sub-plot to speed up the pacing. While the rejections are super nice and some even complimentary, they’re still rejections. By editing further, that cut my ms from 100k words to 76k. I haven’t sent out any more queries. I decided to hire an editor who is a query guru to help with my letter and full synopsis. I hope it pans out. Fantasy is so hard to market. My NA romance was so much easier to shop out and attract interested people. I never know what an agent wants. Even after reading all of their blogs, Twitter feeds, wish lists, Publishers Marketplace pages, and agency sites. I think some of it depends on the day, and of course, a lot of luck.

              Like

  15. Marie @ drizzleandhurricanebooks says:

    Thank you so, so much for such an enlightening blog post, I loved reading all of these answers, it is comforting and good to see that people are thinking success is linked to the amount of interactions, really, and not the amount of page-views and followers. Interactions and being part of a community really is THE best, I think 🙂

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I’m so glad you found it helpful! It’s can definitely be unsettling to have no idea if your stats are normal, or great, or low, or whatever!

      Like

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