Why the Future of Book Blogging May Be Co-Blogging

Tasks for Bloggers-min

Why Book Bloggers Might Start Co-Blogging

Book bloggers in general seem reluctant to take on co-bloggers.  We value our independence on our blogs, and several of us have tried co-blogging with less than stellar results.  However, book blogging has changed drastically since Krysta and I began (as co-bloggers) five years ago, and “successful” bloggers are expected to do more than write thoughtful book reviews.  Now, bloggers are often expected to provide a steady stream of content to readers and possess talents far beyond good writing.  To stand out from the crowd, bloggers may want to take on other bloggers with complementary skills who can help them juggle it all.

co-blog poll

*Disclaimer: Of course I’m not claiming any one blogger “has” to do any particular thing to be successful.  However, general trends are that bloggers are frequently expected to do more than simply write.

Tasks for Book Bloggers

Writing Content

The number one thing any blog has is engaging content, and followers often expect to see at least a couple posts per week.  Book bloggers may need to write book reviews, discussion posts, and more.  Of course, prep time for writing content includes reading the books being reviewed or discussed.

Keeping Up with the News

Bloggers who want to provide their readers with unique content often keep up with bookish news.  This includes reading news about book releases, authors, and the publishing industry, as well as reading other blogs and keeping abreast of current topics in the blogosphere.

Taking Photos

Many bloggers,in an effort to avoid copyright infringement and to make their blogs original, have taken up book photography.  Many bloggers do elaborate photoshoots and share their photos on Instagram, as well as on their blogs.

Boy Most Likely To 2

Making Graphics

Even if bloggers are using stock photos, it takes time to make unique graphics for reach post–something which is recommended to make sure the graphics are suitable for Pinterest and other social sharing.

Organizing Events

Planning events is not necessary for book bloggers, but many do this anyway.  Running blog tours can help a book blogger make money, but even less official events can help bloggers find followers and connect with other readers.

Running Social media

Part of running a blog is promoting the blog.  Most book bloggers seem to prefer Twitter.  However, many are also on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest.  Add book-specific social media like Goodreads, Riffle, and Litsy, and blog  promotion can take up a good chunk of time.

Replying to Comments

Readers frequently admit they stop engaging with bloggers who fail to respond to comments.  Thus, successful bloggers will reply to comments on their own blog,as well as read other blogs and leave comments there.

Managing It All

As bloggers continue to ask what it would take for them to make money from book blogging. it makes sense that they would realize the first step is to grow their blogs big enough that authors and publishers would find paying them worthwhile.  In my opinion, to get a huge audience, a book blog would need to provide readers with a lot of  unique and timely content.  Such a blog might even be magazine-style, with bloggers dedicated to different departments: book news, reviews of recent releases, discussion posts, photograph, etc.

Most book blogger cannot do everything.  We have school, jobs, family.  We cannot always post as frequently as we want or keep up with all the news. Co-blogging could solve that for bloggers seriously invested in growing or even monetizing their blogs.

What do you think? Could you see yourself co-blogging?

Update: Since a lot of commenters mentioned interest in finding a co-blogger, Stephanie from Rantings, Ravings, and Ramblings has put together an application to try to match up bloggers. Check it out here!

Briana

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101 thoughts on “Why the Future of Book Blogging May Be Co-Blogging

  1. Joey @ thoughts and afterthoughts says:

    I’d actually really love to have someone to co-blog with but the difficult part is finding an individual who meshes with the voice you’re trying to create. Know that I’m not discounting the importance and value of different voices. It can just be difficult to write content with satire, profanity and all that snarky goodness (which is what comes naturally to me) if you’re collaborating with someone who doesn’t typically express their opinions in that manner — if that makes sense? (And I hope it does).

    So definitely a big props to those blogs run by co-bloggers. And even more props to those who co-blog and run their own show elsewhere haha.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Briana says:

      Sometimes I think we could use a third co-blogger. Or maybe just an intern I can make do all the grunt work like update the review archive. 😉 But I agree it can be really hard to find someone who’s on the same page with you in terms of writing style and even just general commitment. Krysta and I actually did try to have a third co-blogger, twice, and both just kind of disappeared on us.

      I honestly can’t believe some people have their own blog AND co-blog somewhere. It’s so impressive!

      Like

  2. rantandraveaboutbooks says:

    Excellent post! I could see myself co-blogging, but I would need to find someone who matches my work ethic and style. Someone who only wants to contribute once in a while wouldn’t be an ideal partner for me to blog with since I like to post more frequently than some bloggers. I could definitely use help with taking pictures and the photography aspect of blogging. My pictures are terrible! I don’t have any trouble keeping up with my comments, and I try to flip through my WP reader to check out everyone’s posts, but the hardest part is finding the time to connect with new people. It’s hard to find blogs unless someone I know recommends them. And the bigger bloggers or maybe what some might call successful bloggers don’t answer any of their posts, which is a compete turn off. I don’t follow people who don’t respond to comments. It defeats the entire purpose of blogging for me. I also like the idea of guest posts, though most of the people I talk to seem to have a hard enough time thinking of their own posts, let alone write for another blog. I wish I knew someone who likes books as much as me because I’d be more than wiling to share the workload. I have so many half written drafts in my dashboard I haven’t had time to finish that it would be nice to have a partner. Both of your posts and writing style compliment each other so well. I would love to find someone that I work well with.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Read Diverse Books says:

      It’s also a huge turn off for me when big bloggers don’t respond to their comments. I get it that they’re busy, but they can at least try!
      Unless their content is extremely special and valuable, I tend to unfollow that kind of blogger.

      Liked by 2 people

      • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

        I also noticed that big bloggers only talk to people in their small circle, and it’s not very appealing for a new reader. They could probably use a co-blogger. I follow this one blogger and she only comments when she runs a giveaway, and she says I’ll comment if you do X, Y, Z, which normally would not appeal to me, but she has I think 60k followers, and I love her content. I only overlook it with that one blogger though. I agree. I’ll give them an A for effort if they at least try to interact with their followers. Bloggers need to give their readers an incentive to want to follow them.

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        • Read Diverse Books says:

          I can’t even fathom what having 60K followers would be like. Wow.
          But yeah, the effort is what counts.

          I can’t always find the time to read other people’s blogs, though I try my best. But if anyone posts on my blog, I ALWAYS visit their blog by the end of the day and read one of their posts. It’s the least I can do 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

            Oh, I know. Could you imagine 60k? A lot of expectations must come with that though I think she only posts once a week. I try to do the same thing. Even if I don’t check it out during the day I always find time later at night to go through all my apps and see what posts I missed. Sometimes I don’t think everything comes up on the reader, and of course, WP is only sending my pingbacks when they feel like it. That’s such a point of contention anymore.

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        • Briana says:

          I stop commenting on blogs if the blogger never replies. Though if someone has 60K followers, I can forgive them. I still think they should take the time to reply here and there, but I imagine it’d be difficult to write any actual posts if you were trying to reply to hundreds of comments!

          Guest posting is really tough in terms of thinking of ideas. And if I think of a really great idea, sometimes I selfishly want to keep it for my own blog instead of using it for a guest post!

          Liked by 1 person

          • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

            Yeah, I couldn’t even imagine having hundreds of comments to respond to. The amount of time that would take alone. I would also want to keep that really good idea for my own blog. I like what you’re doing with the classics guest post. That’s a really good idea. This way you’ll get a wide range of various books and topics.

            Like

    • Joey @ thoughts and afterthoughts says:

      Admittedly, commenting back has been one of the biggest hurdles for me in the past few months. Last year, I’m sure I commented back within 48 hours but now it’s taking me several weeks; which actually probably comes with the territory that newer content just pushes the old ones that need to be commented on further back and it just gets lost in the abyss (which I still feel shitty for haha).

      Liked by 1 person

      • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

        Damn, that’s a long time. I follow your blog and I’ve read some of your posts. They’re very entertaining. I like reading and responding to my followers comments, and I try to respond within say 8 hours, which is fast by some standards, but I’m addicted to my phone. And I have a job where I’m waiting for computer programs to run all day and it’s boring as all hell, so I need something to keep me from falling asleep. I’m okay with 48 hours, though I’d probably forget all about a post I commented on days before unless it was mind blowing awesome. At that point, like you said, I’d be moving onto the next thing. I do respond to comments that are sometimes weeks after I wrote the post. I still get comments on my negative reviews, which surprises me. Even if it’s a comment that doesn’t really require a response I acknowledge it by liking it or thanking them for taking the time to comment. Maybe you could just like the comments so they know you saw it and respond at your leisure. I know a few bloggers who do that.

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        • Krysta says:

          Yeah, replying to comments can take a lot of time. I try to do it within the day, though, or else I too might forget about someone and I don’t want them to feel ignored! But sometimes it feels like not being able to find commenting is some sort of dirty secret. We all know it’s really difficult, but we don’t want to say it because we know we’re supposed to be interacting with each other. So I really don’t mind if someone doesn’t comment back immediately. But if someone NEVER answers my comment on my blog (or any other comments) I usually just move along. It feels kind of awkward, like when you say something in a group conversation and the group ignores you and talks about something else. Like Oh…was…I really invited? Is it okay if I talk to you guys? You know what, I’m going to see if there are any crackers left….

          Liked by 2 people

          • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

            Yes, that’s exactly what it feels like, especially when other comments are answered and yours is ignored. I feel like I just wasted my time. You always answer your comments. 😉 I don’t like when people write discussion posts and then they’re too afraid to answer their own comments. I feel like saying then don’t write something that might have a little backlash if you can’t handle it. I’m assuming that’s why they don’t answer the comments for a discussion post. But that still annoys me because isn’t that the point of the discussion post? I think some bloggers just don’t get it.

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  3. Read Diverse Books says:

    I love the idea of co-blogging! I would excel at the social media aspect of blogging. I spend a lot of my time on Twitter promoting my brand and slowly growing my audience. I see it as important visiting other bloggers and leaving comments. I do both, of course. But if can’t find the time to leave a thoughtful comment on a blog, I spent time on Twitter growing that aspect of my blog.

    Liked by 2 people

    • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

      That’s a great idea! When I’m not finding anything on Word Press, I switch over to Twitter and look for new bloggers or comment on posts I find. Some blogs I only follow on Twitter, just because they’re not WP, and I’m not a fan of signing up for blogs that send out newsletters. I swear I’m developing carpal tunnel from tweeting. Haha!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Briana says:

      I’d like to be better at Twitter. I’m on it frequently, but I’m not sure I’ve mastered it in terms of branding or even just tweeting the kinds of things people find interesting. Maybe witty 140 character messages just aren’t my calling!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Read Diverse Books says:

        Yeah, it’s not for everyone. But it came so naturally to me. I am loud and opinionated and have lots of time for micro-blogging while I’m at work that it has worked out very well. I have far more Twitter followers than WordPress followers, which leads to a lot of traffic to my blog.

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        • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

          I honestly have no idea what I’m doing on Twitter. I look for bloggers and try to interact but I’m always like okay what else should I be doing. I read you should post meaningful content that’s not blog related, but I have no idea what that even means. I need to get better at Twitter and Instagram. My pictures are horrifying. Some of them literally make me cringe they’re so bad.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Krysta says:

            My pictures aren’t that great, but I can usually get away with taking photographs if I try to follow the rule of thirds and then tweak the coloring and lighting on my computer. At least I think my photos look better than most of my family’s. I can never get a good photo or headshot from them because they all insist on taking me full body length smack in the middle of the photo. This is a real problem for me when I need to submit a photo for something. I have tried setting the timer and taking the photos myself but then of course I am guessing whether or not I am even in the frame! My life is hard. 😉

            Liked by 1 person

            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              I know what you mean. My family does the same thing with these stupid diagonal shots I can never use for a profile picture. I had the hardest time finding a picture to use for Twitter. My Instagram pictures are frighteningly bad. But I get a kick out of my adventures in photography. I’m creative when it comes to writing and making crafts and planing parties but pictures are where I’m clueless.

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            • Krysta says:

              Ah! Yes! I had one picture of myself last summer and the person taking it had the camera tilted! Why?!

              Sometimes I read photography tutorials online and I know some libraries have online access where you can take Universal classes free and they probably have a photography option. I just sometimes wonder if you need to have like an innate eye for photos, though. Yes, I know black-and-white brings out texture and stuff, but here I am walking for hours trying to find something texture-y to take a photo of… and failing.

              Liked by 1 person

            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              I think some people have the eye for it. I couldn’t take a good picture to save my life. When I go on vacation, I’m lucky if I have 10 usable shots. I love black and white photos. But even that wouldn’t save my terrible pictures.

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            • Krysta says:

              They look about my level of skill, so I’m going to say they’re fine!! (I was truly expecting something much worse, though–you should see some of my family’s photo albums. Every time they do a group shot, everyone is really tiny and full-length in the middle, so you can’t see anyone they’ve taken a photo of!)

              Liked by 1 person

            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              That’s funny. Maybe you’ll turn into an expert photographer and you can take the family pictures instead. My mom is pretty good, but she insists on taking 10 different angles. I’m like jeez mom you’re not Nigel Barker or some famous photographer get on with the show. You don’t think they’re bad? I’m shocked. Haha! I look at my Instagram the way I’d look at a moldy hamburger. 😝

              Like

  4. luvtoread says:

    Great post! I think a co-blogger would be great, because it would help generate content. It takes me awhile to get a post together, plus the time it takes for me to actually read the book I’m reviewing. I like doing tags because those posts take a little less time. I have a ton of post ideas and would love to post more, but life seems to get in the way. I try to read each post of blogs that I follow, which on some days can take me several hours. I wouldn’t want to miss out on any comments or anything if I had a co-blogger. My biggest problem is with the time social media takes. I’d love to be active with my Twitter account, but I just don’t know if I have the time. I mainly use Instagram, Goodreads and Facebook, but I’m not always active because again, time. I would love to be able to monetize my blog and therefore cut back on my 9 to 5, but I don’t want people to feel I am trying to sell them something. Sometimes I feel I am spending so much time on my blog & WordPress & social media that I’m missing out on reading actual books. This is why I think a co-blogger would help. So yes, I could see myself co-blogging at some point, I think it might greatly ease my stress about not being active enough on social media. This was a great post – thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Briana says:

      Yes! I have a whole list of posts I want to write “when I get the time!” And there’s so much prep work behind every post. I think sometimes people overlook the hours it takes to read a book before you can even sit down to review it. Then add all the formatting and any graphics you want…and it’s not a quick thing to write even just one post!

      I also love the idea that having a co-blogger can help you get back time to read. That is why most of us started book blogging! But it may be possible to find someone who’s really just into photography or social media who can help out.

      Liked by 1 person

      • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

        Lately I’ve noticed that I’m writing so much I barely find time to read. I think it’s also my book selection. Nothing is working for me at all, not even the books everyone raves over. You’re so right. Even the posts I think will take me less than an hour to write end up taking me hours, if not days. That pulls me away from reading and fiction writing, and of course, life and other things. A co-blogger would be a huge help.

        Liked by 1 person

      • luvtoread says:

        Oh I’m so glad to hear that it takes you awhile to write a post. Sometimes I get so discouraged with people churning out posts right and left, I feel like I am just not keeping up. And then I try to remind myself that I started this to have fun, and then I make myself take a step back and that seems to help. I enjoy doing all of it, it’s just difficult to do it all, and to do it all and be happy with what I’ve posted.

        Liked by 1 person

        • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

          For the most part, I post every day, but each post is time consuming. Even the tags take time. It’s the ones where I’m annoyed about something like my rants or the one I did on one star reviews that I wrote so fast I couldn’t believe it. That’s usually when I know I wrote something worth reading. Lately, I have a bunch of half finished posts, and I need to feel inspired to write or I leave it untouched in my WP dashboard. It’s the posts I’m only half in it that I’m like why did you even bother? I decided this week that if I’m not feeling it I won’t post. I think taking a step back is definitely a good idea. I do the same thing with my fiction writing when I have writer’s block and it works every time. Exactly! We’re all doing this for fun. I was starting to feel like it was work keeping up with my everyday schedule I imposed on myself, and now that I’ve decided that’s a bad idea, I’m much happier. It was too stressful trying to write posts each day.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Stefanie says:

            I used to have a pretty tight schedule as well (though nothing close to posting every day) but with work and a lot of other things happening in my life I just can’t get excited about blogging some days. That combined with reading less these days just makes it so that I’m posting less, but I’m trying not to care. It would be nice to be putting out more content, but I’m also doing other stuff which is also important. That’s one of the reasons I’m interested in finding a co-blogger, that way there would still be more content than I would be putting out by myself, yet it would lessen the pressure. Plus, just having someone to discuss post-ideas with would be a lot of fun I imagine. I had almost found someone who would have been my co-blogger, but it took her forever to get around to responding to anything concerning the blog (like months, I’m not exaggerating) so I let that ship sail.

            Liked by 1 person

            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              A co-blogger would definitely help lighten the workload. I’m very picky about writing, so I would have to find someone who is like me. I honestly have no idea how I’ve been writing this much, but I’m getting tired. I put my fiction writing to the side and wrote posts instead, which was not smart, considering I’m now 4 weeks behind with my editor on one book and probably 3 months behind on my second one. That wasn’t the smartest move, but I was so into writing posts I couldn’t find the inspiration for my fiction writing. Now, I’m shifting gears back to my books. But doing all of that and working a super stressful job is hard, and my fiancé is starting to get annoyed with the amount of time I’m writing blog posts. I don’t blame him though. It’s become a mild obsession for me. Oh, wow. Someone who takes months to respond? I don’t care how busy someone says they are because even famous authors would respond faster than a few months. It’s a good thing you decided not to pair up with her. That wouldn’t been a real headache for you.

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            • Stefanie says:

              Shifting gears just like that doesn’t sound very easy, especially if you were really inspired for blogging things! I hope the writing of books is working out for you now 🙂 I hope you find a good way to balance all these things (writing, working, having a life).
              And yeah, I imagine she read the emails quite early on but then just never really got around to responding… and when she did finally get around to it, she clearly didn’t put in that much effort. It was pretty tough to decide to let that go though, because I really wanted a co-blogger (partly due to a huge blogging slump on my part and I thought this might be the thing to save me) and I don’t really know where else I can find someone who feels up to the task. But I still think I saved myself a lot of trouble/annoyance by not going ahead with the co-blogging in that instance!

              Liked by 1 person

            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              No, it’s not easy. Writing a book and writing a blog is two different animals. To me, blog writing is more editorial where fiction writing is more about creativity. Not that blogging doesn’t require creativity because it most certainly does, but it’s a different creative mindset, and if I’m not 100% invested, my prose ends up sounding dull and uninspired. It’s the same thing for blog writing. I’m no longer in my characters heads once I go into “blog mode,” which makes the shift hard.

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            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              Oops, I hit send before I was done typing. That’s a shame she was such a flake. Blogging takes planning and time, so it’s important to find someone who understands that. Hopefully one day you’ll find someone who matches your style. I would love a co-blogger, but I don’t think that will be easy for me to find. As far as creative control and writing, I’m very picky. I’m also picky about what I read, let alone the person sharing my blog. Briana and Krysta have that cohesion with Pages Unbound that we’d all love to have. It’s no surprise how they’ve managed to make it 5 years together.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Stefanie says:

              Yeah, I can’t help but be a little jealous (in a very loving way!) of their co-blogging experience! It’s about finding someone who has the same view on blogging but at the same time someone who brings something new to the table. I also think that if there are two already active bloggers coming together, a lot of discussions need to be had. Will they be picking one of the two already existing blogs? will they find a new blog? and many more things like that. But I think that if you have found the right partner, it will be well worth to have these “discussions”

              Liked by 1 person

            • rantandraveaboutbooks says:

              Two exiting bloggers would probably need to start a new one and rebrand to their existing followers. Otherwise, I’d think they’d run the risk of losing the vibe of their new blog. Or maybe they could sort of guest post on each other’s blogs until they got the hang of it. I would imagine that would have its complications.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Stefanie says:

              Yeah, I think either of these options would be better than just picking one blog. That would probably feel unfair to whichever blog didn’t get chosen I imagine. and that would make you “stuck” with the brand of the blog you did pick. so the merger and the guest post thing circumvent that trouble in a great way I think.

              Liked by 1 person

  5. anhdara13 says:

    This is a very interesting post. I’ve never thought about it this way if I’m honest. Most blogs I’ve visited (barring a few) have just one blogger behind them, so I don’t know…

    I’m still a relatively new blogger, but I don’t think I could see myself co-blogging. I like having control over my blog (at the moment), and I’m still trying to get into the groove of it all. Still trying to develop a style I’m comfortable with, etc. But who knows, maybe in the future I’ll change my mind?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Briana says:

      I think independence and control are really important to a lot of bloggers. And collaborative types of writing in general can be a tough sell because writing seems so solitary.

      It makes sense to me that a lot of bloggers will stay independent, but there’s also a lot of talk of monetizing book blogs in the blogosphere, and I think that for many people that would necessitate having more than one blogger at work.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Jeann @ Happy Indulgence says:

    The first time I tried co-blogging, it was a complete nightmare and it took me years to get over it. But I know I needed co-bloggers because of how busy my life is. Now I’ve found the right people and I couldn’t be happier! Now blogging feels like a fun hobby as opposed to a job.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Briana says:

      Yes! Finding a good co-blogger can be really hard, and I know several bloggers who’ve told me they had bad experiences. I’m glad it’s working out for you now, though!

      Like

  7. Yani says:

    Uhm, no. I don’t see myself as a co-blogger. But I do have a co-blogger but she only posts book reviews which is where she is quite good at. I love how she writes her book reviews. Sometimes, I do not write a review of a book I’ve read, I just rate it on Goodreads, so I rely sometimes on her.

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I don’t review every book I read either. I think that would be kind of exhausting, honestly. It’s awesome you have someone who also likes writing reviews, though!

      Like

  8. Stefanie says:

    I, like others here, have been looking for a co-blogger also. It’s something that seems pretty hard to find, because it’s important that you share at least partly the same view of what your blog should be like. But I think it would be great to have someone with whom I can share the load. that way there would be a more constant flow of posts but also the fact that you can complement each other but also inspire each other by just talking about blogging.

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I’ve been surprised by how many people are looking for a co-blogger because the reaction on Twitter was basically “nope, not for me!” But finding the right co-blogger is the real challenge, I suppose.

      Like

      • Stefanie says:

        That’s indeed pretty funny that there is such a difference between here and on twitter. Maybe it’s because all of the people here are mostly bad at social media management? and that’s why they are looking for co-bloggers? or maybe it’s just a coincidence 🙂

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  9. readbooksanddrinkcoffee says:

    I personally could never see myself co-blogging anytime soon. The main reason I blog is to get my own opinion out there. Originally I was going to start up this blog with a friend of mine but she’s really busy and it was more realistic for me to do it on my own.
    – Yasmin

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Lauren @ Wonderless Reviews says:

    Great post! I definitely understand the appeal and benefits of co-blogging and one of favourite blogs is managed by 3 bloggers. I don’t think I could be a co-blogger though. I just have this annoying need to have complete control over everything, haha. It would just make too anxious. There’s only one person I could see myself co-blogging with and she’s not really a book blogger. It would definitely be helpful when it comes to saving time though!

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    • Krysta says:

      Honestly, I’m not sure I could see myself co-blogging with anyone but Briana because I would have a certain vision and probably have 100% more commitment than half the people I could ask. But Briana and I basically the think the same way, plus I get away with her doing all the social media and graphics. So…I am actually the lazy partner here?

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Ellen @ Quest Reviews says:

    I think co-blogging would be really fun to do! I’ve been a lone wolf for so long, I wouldn’t mind either helping out others or getting help. The only thing is, I would be really hesitant to be like, “Hey, I’m Ellen, mind if I blog with you?” It would seem roughly equivalent to asking someone, “Hey, I’m Ellen, want to go get coffee sometime?” LOL! OK, maybe not THAT hard…

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    • Stefanie says:

      I so know how you feel! You can’t just go onto someone’s blog and be all like: hey I’m looking for someone to blog with and you seem like a cool blogger, so yeah, let’s give it a go?!
      Or maybe you can and I just don’t feel like that’s the right move for me 🙂

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        • Stefanie says:

          so true! That would be awesome! I was thinking that it could be a bit like the international geek girl pen pals thing. (I signed up for that about a year ago). In any case, they take applications and you just have to mention some certain geekdoms you are part of and then they find someone to become your pen pal. It was awesome and it would be more awesome if something similar existed for finding a co-blogger!

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  12. Fatima @ NoteablePad says:

    This post has convinced me that I would benefit from co-blogging. It’s becoming increasingly difficult to consistently post, comment, take pictures, and on top of that basically live my life. Maintaining an active social media presence is also so hard for me at the moment – I forget to tweet, or post a new picture on Instragram. But as many comments have pointed out, it’s hard to find someone with a similar voice to your own or someone that has the same opinions as you. There’s a big chance of both voices clashing. If you’re lucky enough to find someone to co-blog with, it’s worth it. Maybe sometime, albeit probably not in the near future, I’d be willing to give it a go. That is, if blogging becomes really difficult to do by myself.

    Also, how do you find someone to co-blog with? Do you put like an advertisement on your blog luring fellow bloggers with promise of long hours writing posts and the job of PR? How would you go about convincing them to blog with you?

    Like

    • Stefanie says:

      yeah, it’s the finding someone who it could work with that trips me up too. I’ve figured out that it would be nice for me to share the blog with someone, now all I have to do is find the person who is suited for the job. I always imagined it would be cool to blog with one of my IRL friends, but none of them are very blogish (or at least not combined with bookish). And I don’t have that many real connections in the blogosphere either, so I’d be left with randomly trying to find someone. And l have no idea how I would go about trying to convince a stranger that blogging with me would be a great idea!

      Like

      • Krysta says:

        I’ve seen people ask for co-bloggers on Twitter and on their blogs. You could always put up a little application. I don’t know how successful that’s been for others, though. I wonder if the problem is that you’d mostly be advertising to people who already have their own blogs and are reluctant to commit to another.

        I guess if you wanted to convince people to blog with you, though, you could write a little blurb about how unique your blog is, almost like you’re a business trying to attract new talent?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Stefanie says:

          I’m not really a twitter person (I don’t think I even have a twitter anymore) so that is not really an option right now. I was just talking about this with Rantandaraveaboutbooks in another comment. If you find someone who also has a blog so many discussions need to be had about how to go about the merging of blogs or if you’re only keeping one of the two, or maybe you find a new blog, or whatever. There are just so many things that need to be discussed in such a situation. Not that I would be unwilling to have these talks, but it’s definitely something that can be seen as a bit of a hindrance on the road to find a new co-blogger.

          Like

      • Fatima @ NoteablePad says:

        Haha me too. My real life friends are busy with life and university, so I can’t exactly ask them to give up a lot of their time to co-blog with me.

        As for asking strangers to co-blog with you – we need to make like a dating site for bloggers interested in co-blogging, except there’s no dating, just matching compatible bloggers. Hopefully it’ll do a good job of matching us with the right blogger.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Julie S. says:

    Wish I could add to your poll. Yes we co-blog on the book blog now 🙂 And it helps so much to split up all the work! Because we do so much work, and as book bloggers, FOR FREE! At least with my family lifestyle blog I do make a profit.

    Like

  14. Liam @ Hey Ashers! says:

    I just spent at least ten minutes reading through the comments to this post, and didn’t even get through half of them. The post is awesome, and everyone’s comments are so on point. I relate to it all (as you can probably tell by all the comments I Liked).

    As a lot of other people said: I’d be open to co-blogging, for all the reasons you listed. I’m especially lazy about social media (I’ve only updated my Twitter a couple times, and that was about two years ago), and would love some help in that department.

    But a co-blogger would only happen if I could find someone who meshed well with my voice (like Joey said), my work ethic (like Jill said), my blog’s goal (which is more focused on in-depth critiques than brief reviews), and my general idea of what good, mediocre, and bad books look like. I’m, uh, picky to say the least, and wouldn’t feel comfortable co-blogging with someone whose sense of good writing was much different from my own. Also, that person would need to be a friend, and not just some random blogger whom I’ve only ever interacted with through WordPress, etc.

    In short, I’d be looking for a unicorn. Maybe it’ll happen one day, but I won’t be holding my breath. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Briana says:

      It took me quite awhile to get through all the comments myself! I’ve been so surprised and touched by how well this post has seemed to resonate with other bloggers!

      I do think finding someone you work well with is the key, and the hardest part! All the things you list seems to cover it–writing style, opinion on books, work ethic. And you definitely want someone you get along with and can trust!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. purplemoonmyst says:

    This is a great post! You hit the nail on the head with all that book bloggers are expected to do. It is almost like a full-time job. HOWEVER, I still do not want a co-blogger. I like having all control over my content and stuff. Plus I enjoy doing all these things and learning.

    Like

  16. DoingDewey says:

    Wow, you seem to have touched a nerve with this post! As you expressed so well,, I like the idea of a co-blogger but I am nervous about giving up my independent creative control of my blog. I feel strongly about many of my design and content decisions and I wouldn’t want adding a co-bloggers to mean those things had to change. I also worry about finding someone with whom my style would mesh well and with whom I could collaborate happily. Most of all, I really value my blog and giving someone else the power to change it is a scary idea. I love the idea of having some help though and of potentially being able to do more with my blog than I can manage on my own!

    Like

    • Briana says:

      I have been very surprised by the response, but I guess pointing out all the hard work that goes into blogging resonates with people!

      I definitely think co-blogging can be a challenge, particularly if there is one blogger joining an already-established blog. I guess Krysta and I had the advantage of starting out together, so there wasn’t quite the same possibility of one of us not quite fitting in with what “had already been done.” 🙂

      Like

  17. Geraldine @ Corralling Books says:

    Mm, awesome post, Briana!
    I know that for me, I value the independence of my blog a lot – that’s why I don’t think I’ll ever get a coblogger. If anything, I would love to collaborate with another blogger to create a coblogging blog, like what Happy Indulgence is, but yeah my blog right now is like my baby – unless you’re really trustworthy, I probably won’t trust you with it, because there is honestly so much that goes on that I want to be on top of!

    Like

    • Briana says:

      As long as you’re happy with you’re blog, that’s the most important!

      Krysta and I had the advantage of starting the blog together, so perhaps neither of us really had expectations the other person could ruin. :p

      Like

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